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TITLE
'Culloden Tales'
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_HUGH_ALLISON_02
PLACENAME
Culloden
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Croy and Dalcross
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hugh Allison
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1332
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from 'Culloden Tales' by Hugh Allison, published in 2007. It is read here by the author.

'The roll of the storyteller, the Seanachaidh, here at Culloden is essential for both the giving and receiving of tales. There is a need, in such places, for someone who sees it as important to learn the stories - old and new - and who can choose which stories to tell, to which visitors, in order to make the very ground sing, and the place have proper meaning and significance. I do not know how often, or if ever, I manage to do that, but I try. I do that because I feel that I owe it to the distinguished storytelling family that I follow, on the battlefield.

Mrs Annabell Cameron (nee Bell Macdonald) was the last inhabitant of Leanach Cottage; the last of her line to guide people around the Moor. She was long-lived, and a Battlefield Guide most of her days. Leanach Cottage was left empty after Bell died in 1912, aged approximately 83 years.

Her father, James Macdonald of Leanach, was a guide on the field before her, and was the man called upon in 1846, to guide notable visitors around the Moor on the 100th anniversary of the battle. A decade earlier, in 1835, when a new road was driven through the graves, it was said in a local journal, 'James Macdonald, however, who lived in the old house of Leanach and saw the work done, said the bones had all been reinterred.'

Bell's grandfather, also James Macdonald (but of Culchunaig), was an even earlier guide, (sometimes described by the old term - local cicerone).

The mother of that older James Macdonald was still living with her parents, at Culchunaig, in 1746. She was baking, on the day of the battle, when a Highlander who had lost his hand rushed in, and cauterised the bleeding stump by pressing it on the hot stones of the fire-place.

These five generations have done an excellent job in setting the standard, (to which I have continually aspired), for storytellers on the site.'

Hugh G Allison was born and brought up in Lochaber. In 1977 he went to Glasgow University to study Geography and Geology, and much later (in 2008) he graduated with a BA from the Open University. He worked first with Tourist Boards, and then with Nairn District Council, becoming their Tourism and Entertainments Officer in 1983.

Hugh married in 1986, and both of his daughters were brought up in Nairn. He remained with the Council through local government reorganisation, and worked with Highland Council until 2000. During that time he helped found Moscow's first ever Highland Games, and was seconded to work on a number of projects in Wales and in North America.

In 2001 he took a job with the National Trust for Scotland at Culloden. While with the Trust he managed both Culloden Battlefield and Brodie Castle. He also began tour guiding for cruise ship visitors, and wrote three books: 'Roots of Stone' (2004) looks at the tapestry of the last 2000 years of Scottish history, especially the relationships between family history and national history; 'Rivers Running Far' (2005) examines the Scottish diaspora, particularly motivations and outcomes, whilst at the same time explaining how Hugh was sworn in as a Kentucky Deputy Sheriff during his research; 'Culloden Tales' (2007) is a readable and accurate history of the battle, with tales from those who have visited the moor.

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'Culloden Tales'

INVERNESS: Croy and Dalcross

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Hugh Allison

This audio extract is from 'Culloden Tales' by Hugh Allison, published in 2007. It is read here by the author.<br /> <br /> 'The roll of the storyteller, the Seanachaidh, here at Culloden is essential for both the giving and receiving of tales. There is a need, in such places, for someone who sees it as important to learn the stories - old and new - and who can choose which stories to tell, to which visitors, in order to make the very ground sing, and the place have proper meaning and significance. I do not know how often, or if ever, I manage to do that, but I try. I do that because I feel that I owe it to the distinguished storytelling family that I follow, on the battlefield. <br /> <br /> Mrs Annabell Cameron (nee Bell Macdonald) was the last inhabitant of Leanach Cottage; the last of her line to guide people around the Moor. She was long-lived, and a Battlefield Guide most of her days. Leanach Cottage was left empty after Bell died in 1912, aged approximately 83 years.<br /> <br /> Her father, James Macdonald of Leanach, was a guide on the field before her, and was the man called upon in 1846, to guide notable visitors around the Moor on the 100th anniversary of the battle. A decade earlier, in 1835, when a new road was driven through the graves, it was said in a local journal, 'James Macdonald, however, who lived in the old house of Leanach and saw the work done, said the bones had all been reinterred.'<br /> <br /> Bell's grandfather, also James Macdonald (but of Culchunaig), was an even earlier guide, (sometimes described by the old term - local cicerone). <br /> <br /> The mother of that older James Macdonald was still living with her parents, at Culchunaig, in 1746. She was baking, on the day of the battle, when a Highlander who had lost his hand rushed in, and cauterised the bleeding stump by pressing it on the hot stones of the fire-place.<br /> <br /> These five generations have done an excellent job in setting the standard, (to which I have continually aspired), for storytellers on the site.' <br /> <br /> Hugh G Allison was born and brought up in Lochaber. In 1977 he went to Glasgow University to study Geography and Geology, and much later (in 2008) he graduated with a BA from the Open University. He worked first with Tourist Boards, and then with Nairn District Council, becoming their Tourism and Entertainments Officer in 1983.<br /> <br /> Hugh married in 1986, and both of his daughters were brought up in Nairn. He remained with the Council through local government reorganisation, and worked with Highland Council until 2000. During that time he helped found Moscow's first ever Highland Games, and was seconded to work on a number of projects in Wales and in North America. <br /> <br /> In 2001 he took a job with the National Trust for Scotland at Culloden. While with the Trust he managed both Culloden Battlefield and Brodie Castle. He also began tour guiding for cruise ship visitors, and wrote three books: 'Roots of Stone' (2004) looks at the tapestry of the last 2000 years of Scottish history, especially the relationships between family history and national history; 'Rivers Running Far' (2005) examines the Scottish diaspora, particularly motivations and outcomes, whilst at the same time explaining how Hugh was sworn in as a Kentucky Deputy Sheriff during his research; 'Culloden Tales' (2007) is a readable and accurate history of the battle, with tales from those who have visited the moor.