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TITLE
'My Schools and Schoolmasters' (2)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_HUGH_MILLER_02
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hugh Miller
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1337
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from Hugh Miller's autobiographical book, 'My Schools and Schoolmasters', first published in 1854. It is read here by Norman Newton.

'Loch Maree, one of the wildest of our Highland Lakes, and at this time scarce at all known to the tourist, owes to it all that is peculiar in its appearance - its tall pyramidal quartz mountains, that rise at one stride, steep, and well-nigh as naked as the old Pyramids, from nearly the level of the sea, to heights on which at midsummer snows of the winter gleam white in streaks and patches; and a picturesque sandstone tract of precipitous hills, which flanks its western shore, and bore at this period the remains of one of the old pine forests. A continuous wall of gneiss mountains, that runs along the eastern side of the lake, sinks sheer into its brown depths, save at one point, where a level tract, half-encircled by precipices, is occupied by fields and copsewood, and bears in the midst a white mansion-house; the blue expanse of the lake greatly broadens in its lower reaches; and a group of partially submerged hillocks, that resemble the forest-covered ones on its western shores, but are of lower altitude, rise over its waters, and form a miniature archipelago, grey with lichened stone, and bosky with birch and hazel.'

Born and brought up in Cromarty, Hugh Miller was apprenticed as a stone mason at the age of 16, a career he followed for the next 17 years. He developed an interest in fossils and explored the landscapes of the Black Isle, reading widely and eventually becoming one of the best-known exponents of the new sciences of palaeontology and geology. He also wrote occasional articles for the 'Inverness Courier'.

Hugh became deeply involved in church politics and was the leading journalist of the Disruption, editing 'The Witness' from 1835 until his death. He shot himself at his home in Portobello in 1859 in controversial circumstances which included possible brain disease, exhaustion, depression and perhaps an inability to reconcile his science with his theology.

Hugh Miller's Cottage in Cromarty, in which he was born, is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland and contains a museum of his life and work.

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'My Schools and Schoolmasters' (2)

ROSS: Cromarty

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Hugh Miller

This audio extract is from Hugh Miller's autobiographical book, 'My Schools and Schoolmasters', first published in 1854. It is read here by Norman Newton.<br /> <br /> 'Loch Maree, one of the wildest of our Highland Lakes, and at this time scarce at all known to the tourist, owes to it all that is peculiar in its appearance - its tall pyramidal quartz mountains, that rise at one stride, steep, and well-nigh as naked as the old Pyramids, from nearly the level of the sea, to heights on which at midsummer snows of the winter gleam white in streaks and patches; and a picturesque sandstone tract of precipitous hills, which flanks its western shore, and bore at this period the remains of one of the old pine forests. A continuous wall of gneiss mountains, that runs along the eastern side of the lake, sinks sheer into its brown depths, save at one point, where a level tract, half-encircled by precipices, is occupied by fields and copsewood, and bears in the midst a white mansion-house; the blue expanse of the lake greatly broadens in its lower reaches; and a group of partially submerged hillocks, that resemble the forest-covered ones on its western shores, but are of lower altitude, rise over its waters, and form a miniature archipelago, grey with lichened stone, and bosky with birch and hazel.'<br /> <br /> Born and brought up in Cromarty, Hugh Miller was apprenticed as a stone mason at the age of 16, a career he followed for the next 17 years. He developed an interest in fossils and explored the landscapes of the Black Isle, reading widely and eventually becoming one of the best-known exponents of the new sciences of palaeontology and geology. He also wrote occasional articles for the 'Inverness Courier'. <br /> <br /> Hugh became deeply involved in church politics and was the leading journalist of the Disruption, editing 'The Witness' from 1835 until his death. He shot himself at his home in Portobello in 1859 in controversial circumstances which included possible brain disease, exhaustion, depression and perhaps an inability to reconcile his science with his theology. <br /> <br /> Hugh Miller's Cottage in Cromarty, in which he was born, is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland and contains a museum of his life and work.