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TITLE
'My Schools and Schoolmasters' (6)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_HUGH_MILLER_06
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hugh Miller
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1343
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from Hugh Miller's autobiographical book, 'My Schools and Schoolmasters', first published in 1854. It is read here by Norman Newton.

'I had been sent, previous to my father's death, to a dame's school, where I was taught to pronounce my letters to such effect in the Scottish mode, that still, when I attempt spelling a word aloud, which is not often - for I find the process a perilous one - the aa's and ee's, and uh's and vaus, return upon me, and I have to translate them with no little hesitation as I go along, into the more modish sounds. A knowledge of the letters themselves I had already acquired by studying the signposts of the place - rare works of art, that excited my utmost admiration, with jugs, and glasses, and bottles, and ships and loaves of bread upon them; all of which could, as the artists had intended, be actually recognised. During my sixth year I spelt my way, under the dame, through the Shorter Catechism, the Proverbs, and the New Testament, and then entered upon her highest form, as a member of the Bible class; but all the while the process of acquiring learning had been a dark one, which I slowly mastered, in humble confidence in the awful wisdom of the schoolmistress, not knowing whither it tended, when at once my mind awoke to the meaning of that most delightlful of all narratives - the story of Joseph. Was there ever such a discovery made before! I actually found out for myself, that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements.'

Born and brought up in Cromarty, Hugh Miller was apprenticed as a stone mason at the age of 16, a career he followed for the next 17 years. He developed an interest in fossils and explored the landscapes of the Black Isle, reading widely and eventually becoming one of the best-known exponents of the new sciences of palaeontology and geology. He also wrote occasional articles for the 'Inverness Courier'.

Hugh became deeply involved in church politics and was the leading journalist of the Disruption, editing 'The Witness' from 1835 until his death. He shot himself at his home in Portobello in 1859 in controversial circumstances which included possible brain disease, exhaustion, depression and perhaps an inability to reconcile his science with his theology.

Hugh Miller's Cottage in Cromarty, in which he was born, is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland and contains a museum of his life and work.

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'My Schools and Schoolmasters' (6)

ROSS: Cromarty

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Hugh Miller

This audio extract is from Hugh Miller's autobiographical book, 'My Schools and Schoolmasters', first published in 1854. It is read here by Norman Newton.<br /> <br /> 'I had been sent, previous to my father's death, to a dame's school, where I was taught to pronounce my letters to such effect in the Scottish mode, that still, when I attempt spelling a word aloud, which is not often - for I find the process a perilous one - the aa's and ee's, and uh's and vaus, return upon me, and I have to translate them with no little hesitation as I go along, into the more modish sounds. A knowledge of the letters themselves I had already acquired by studying the signposts of the place - rare works of art, that excited my utmost admiration, with jugs, and glasses, and bottles, and ships and loaves of bread upon them; all of which could, as the artists had intended, be actually recognised. During my sixth year I spelt my way, under the dame, through the Shorter Catechism, the Proverbs, and the New Testament, and then entered upon her highest form, as a member of the Bible class; but all the while the process of acquiring learning had been a dark one, which I slowly mastered, in humble confidence in the awful wisdom of the schoolmistress, not knowing whither it tended, when at once my mind awoke to the meaning of that most delightlful of all narratives - the story of Joseph. Was there ever such a discovery made before! I actually found out for myself, that the art of reading is the art of finding stories in books, and from that moment reading became one of the most delightful of my amusements.'<br /> <br /> Born and brought up in Cromarty, Hugh Miller was apprenticed as a stone mason at the age of 16, a career he followed for the next 17 years. He developed an interest in fossils and explored the landscapes of the Black Isle, reading widely and eventually becoming one of the best-known exponents of the new sciences of palaeontology and geology. He also wrote occasional articles for the 'Inverness Courier'. <br /> <br /> Hugh became deeply involved in church politics and was the leading journalist of the Disruption, editing 'The Witness' from 1835 until his death. He shot himself at his home in Portobello in 1859 in controversial circumstances which included possible brain disease, exhaustion, depression and perhaps an inability to reconcile his science with his theology. <br /> <br /> Hugh Miller's Cottage in Cromarty, in which he was born, is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland and contains a museum of his life and work.