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TITLE
'My Schools and Schoolmasters' (7)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_HUGH_MILLER_07
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hugh Miller
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1344
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from Hugh Miller's autobiographical book, 'My Schools and Schoolmasters', first published in 1854. It is read here by Norman Newton.

'I began by getting into a corner at the dismissal of the school, and there conning over to myself the new-found story of Joseph; nor did one perusal serve; the other Scripture stories followed - in especial, the story of Samson and the Philistines, of David and Goliath, of the prohets Elijah and Elisha; and after these came the New Testament stories and parables. Assisted by my uncles, I began to collect a library in a box of birch-bark about nine inches square, which I found quite large enough to contain a great many immortal works - Jack the Giant-Killer, and Jack and the Bean-Stalk, and the Yellow Dwarf, the Blue Beard, and Sinbad the Sailor, and Beauty and the Beast, and Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp, with several others of resembling character. Those intolerable nuisances the useful-knowledge books had not yet arisen, like tenebrious stars, on the education horizon, to darken the world, and shed their blighting influence on the opening intellect of the "youth-hood"; and so, from my rudimental books - books that made themselves truly such by their thorough assimilation with the rudimental mind - I passed on, without being conscious of break or line of division, to books on which the learned are content to write commentaries and dissertations, but which I found to be quite as nice children's books as any of the others.'

Born and brought up in Cromarty, Hugh Miller was apprenticed as a stone mason at the age of 16, a career he followed for the next 17 years. He developed an interest in fossils and explored the landscapes of the Black Isle, reading widely and eventually becoming one of the best-known exponents of the new sciences of palaeontology and geology. He also wrote occasional articles for the 'Inverness Courier'.

Hugh became deeply involved in church politics and was the leading journalist of the Disruption, editing 'The Witness' from 1835 until his death. He shot himself at his home in Portobello in 1859 in controversial circumstances which included possible brain disease, exhaustion, depression and perhaps an inability to reconcile his science with his theology.

Hugh Miller's Cottage in Cromarty, in which he was born, is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland and contains a museum of his life and work.

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'My Schools and Schoolmasters' (7)

ROSS: Cromarty

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Hugh Miller

This audio extract is from Hugh Miller's autobiographical book, 'My Schools and Schoolmasters', first published in 1854. It is read here by Norman Newton.<br /> <br /> 'I began by getting into a corner at the dismissal of the school, and there conning over to myself the new-found story of Joseph; nor did one perusal serve; the other Scripture stories followed - in especial, the story of Samson and the Philistines, of David and Goliath, of the prohets Elijah and Elisha; and after these came the New Testament stories and parables. Assisted by my uncles, I began to collect a library in a box of birch-bark about nine inches square, which I found quite large enough to contain a great many immortal works - Jack the Giant-Killer, and Jack and the Bean-Stalk, and the Yellow Dwarf, the Blue Beard, and Sinbad the Sailor, and Beauty and the Beast, and Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp, with several others of resembling character. Those intolerable nuisances the useful-knowledge books had not yet arisen, like tenebrious stars, on the education horizon, to darken the world, and shed their blighting influence on the opening intellect of the "youth-hood"; and so, from my rudimental books - books that made themselves truly such by their thorough assimilation with the rudimental mind - I passed on, without being conscious of break or line of division, to books on which the learned are content to write commentaries and dissertations, but which I found to be quite as nice children's books as any of the others.'<br /> <br /> Born and brought up in Cromarty, Hugh Miller was apprenticed as a stone mason at the age of 16, a career he followed for the next 17 years. He developed an interest in fossils and explored the landscapes of the Black Isle, reading widely and eventually becoming one of the best-known exponents of the new sciences of palaeontology and geology. He also wrote occasional articles for the 'Inverness Courier'. <br /> <br /> Hugh became deeply involved in church politics and was the leading journalist of the Disruption, editing 'The Witness' from 1835 until his death. He shot himself at his home in Portobello in 1859 in controversial circumstances which included possible brain disease, exhaustion, depression and perhaps an inability to reconcile his science with his theology. <br /> <br /> Hugh Miller's Cottage in Cromarty, in which he was born, is now owned by the National Trust for Scotland and contains a museum of his life and work.