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TITLE
Old High Church, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
HC_INV_BUILDINGS_006
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1995
PERIOD
1990s
SOURCE
The Highland Council
ASSET ID
13455
KEYWORDS
churches
church towers
spires
Old High Church, Inverness

This photograph shows the Old High Church on St. Michael's Mount, Inverness. The mount has been a religious site since before 1171. The present church was completed in 1772 and the remains of its medieval tower can be seen in the lower section of the present church tower. The top of the tower dates from the 17th century and replaces the medieval spire and roof. It has a corbelled parapet and a copper-covered spire. The stone corbel-stones for the original timbers are still in existence inside the belfry. The tower has a clock with four faces, and the bell has been rung at 8pm almost every evening, since 1720. The only time when this was not the case was during World War II

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Old High Church, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1990s

churches; church towers; spires

The Highland Council

Highland Council: Inverness Area (1990s)

This photograph shows the Old High Church on St. Michael's Mount, Inverness. The mount has been a religious site since before 1171. The present church was completed in 1772 and the remains of its medieval tower can be seen in the lower section of the present church tower. The top of the tower dates from the 17th century and replaces the medieval spire and roof. It has a corbelled parapet and a copper-covered spire. The stone corbel-stones for the original timbers are still in existence inside the belfry. The tower has a clock with four faces, and the bell has been rung at 8pm almost every evening, since 1720. The only time when this was not the case was during World War II