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TITLE
'Brimster Tales'
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_JAMES_MILLER_02
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
James Miller
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1363
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from 'Brimster Tales', a popular long-running serial written by James Miller and first published in the Caithness weekly paper - the 'John O' Groat Journal'. The series was produced in book form in 2004.

This extract appeared in the Journal on 19 January 2001. It is read here by the author.

'Sinclair Cattach could hardly open his door fast enough to admit the bustling figure of Bowser Clett.

"I was just coming round," said Cattach, "to work on the crab cage. What's your hurry?"

"Never heed crabs," cried Bowser. "Hev ee seen iss?"

He brandished a copy of a newspaper and, in his excitement, forgot the ferocious nature of Cattach's cat and shoved it from the table. With a loud growl, the beast scuttled off to the kitchen. Bowser opened the paper and pointed to the page spread before him. Cattach peered down at it.

"Ere," cried Bowser, stabbing a photograph.

The picture showed a number of faces, happy faces, mostly female though, on closer inspection, the moustached visage of a man was plainly among them. The man's eyes were half-closed and the plump cheeks conveyed an expression of contentment such as might be seen on a Santa half-seas over.

"Well, now," breathed Cattach. "I think I know that man."

"Ee ken him all richt. We all ken him. At's wir councillor."

Cattach chuckled. "Fit's Magnus been up til?" He read aloud the caption: "Highland councillor caught in red-light area junket."

"I could hardly get intil e shop," said Bowser. "There wis a crowd at e counter fechtan for copies o e paper, and Jean wis ringan e till til e keys were reid-hot."

Cattach read on. The gist was that, after a fact-finding mission to the European Parliament, some Highland councillors had found their way into the streets of Amsterdam where they had obviously been celebrating a successful tour. Among them had been Brimster's own representative, Magnus Stroup.

"Well, it's just like Magnus to have been doing his bit for international relations," observed Cattach. "Hey, at ane wasna born yesterday. See e wrinkles roond her eyes."

"Ee can just aboot see e wrinkles roond everything she's got," said Bowser. "I wonder how Magnus will explain iss on his expenses."

James (Jim) Miller was born and brought up in Caithness. After spells abroad with VSO and the British Council, he returned to the Highlands to work as a freelance writer. He has several books to his credit, including a novel 'A Fine White Stoor' and non-fiction works such as 'Salt in the Blood', 'The North Atlantic Front', 'The Dambuilders' and 'Swords for Hire: The Scottish Mercenary'. Some of his Caithness dialect poetry was published in 'Fangan wi Verses'. Jim also writes for the 'John O' Groat Journal', 'Caithness Courier' and 'Inverness Courier'.

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'Brimster Tales'

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: James Miller

This audio extract is from 'Brimster Tales', a popular long-running serial written by James Miller and first published in the Caithness weekly paper - the 'John O' Groat Journal'. The series was produced in book form in 2004. <br /> <br /> This extract appeared in the Journal on 19 January 2001. It is read here by the author.<br /> <br /> 'Sinclair Cattach could hardly open his door fast enough to admit the bustling figure of Bowser Clett.<br /> <br /> "I was just coming round," said Cattach, "to work on the crab cage. What's your hurry?"<br /> <br /> "Never heed crabs," cried Bowser. "Hev ee seen iss?" <br /> <br /> He brandished a copy of a newspaper and, in his excitement, forgot the ferocious nature of Cattach's cat and shoved it from the table. With a loud growl, the beast scuttled off to the kitchen. Bowser opened the paper and pointed to the page spread before him. Cattach peered down at it. <br /> <br /> "Ere," cried Bowser, stabbing a photograph. <br /> <br /> The picture showed a number of faces, happy faces, mostly female though, on closer inspection, the moustached visage of a man was plainly among them. The man's eyes were half-closed and the plump cheeks conveyed an expression of contentment such as might be seen on a Santa half-seas over.<br /> <br /> "Well, now," breathed Cattach. "I think I know that man."<br /> <br /> "Ee ken him all richt. We all ken him. At's wir councillor."<br /> <br /> Cattach chuckled. "Fit's Magnus been up til?" He read aloud the caption: "Highland councillor caught in red-light area junket."<br /> <br /> "I could hardly get intil e shop," said Bowser. "There wis a crowd at e counter fechtan for copies o e paper, and Jean wis ringan e till til e keys were reid-hot."<br /> <br /> Cattach read on. The gist was that, after a fact-finding mission to the European Parliament, some Highland councillors had found their way into the streets of Amsterdam where they had obviously been celebrating a successful tour. Among them had been Brimster's own representative, Magnus Stroup.<br /> <br /> "Well, it's just like Magnus to have been doing his bit for international relations," observed Cattach. "Hey, at ane wasna born yesterday. See e wrinkles roond her eyes."<br /> <br /> "Ee can just aboot see e wrinkles roond everything she's got," said Bowser. "I wonder how Magnus will explain iss on his expenses."<br /> <br /> James (Jim) Miller was born and brought up in Caithness. After spells abroad with VSO and the British Council, he returned to the Highlands to work as a freelance writer. He has several books to his credit, including a novel 'A Fine White Stoor' and non-fiction works such as 'Salt in the Blood', 'The North Atlantic Front', 'The Dambuilders' and 'Swords for Hire: The Scottish Mercenary'. Some of his Caithness dialect poetry was published in 'Fangan wi Verses'. Jim also writes for the 'John O' Groat Journal', 'Caithness Courier' and 'Inverness Courier'.