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TITLE
'Camerons Calling' (2)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_JANE_DUNCAN_02
PLACENAME
Glen Cannich
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmorack
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Jane Duncan
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1367
KEYWORDS
audio
novels
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from 'Camerons Calling' by Jane Duncan, published in 1966. It is read here by Elizabeth Parker.

'In lower Glen Cannich there stands the ruin of a church and nothing else except broad acres of pasture where hundreds of sheep graze, but in 1800 there was a whole township of little houses with a few acres of cultivated land round each of them. It was in 1804 that the Mr. Gordon who had won Strathdonan from Somerled Macdonald the Gambler 'cleared' this glen, the 'clearance' being the eviction of the people and the burning or pulling down of their houses so that the land could be put under grass for the sheep to eat, because Mr. Gordon could make more money out of sheep than he could make out of people. People, as Aunt told Neil, Donald and me when we first saw the ruined church, do not grow wool which can be made into cloth and sold for money and they cannot be slaughtered and eaten as mutton, so Mr. Gordon 'cleared' the people off his land. This was a thing that happened in many parts of the Highlands, the most notorious of all being the Sutherland Clearances, but Aunt has made something of a special study of the Vannich Clearances, and old Mr. Cameron was tremendously interested in all she could tell him and, after I took in their coffee, they went on talking and Aunt told me to chase Neil and Donald off upstairs.'

Elizabeth Jane Cameron was born on 10th March 1910 in Renton, Dunbartonshire, the daughter of a police constable, Duncan Cameron. Her mother was Janet (Jessie) Sandison. From her parents' names she constructed her two literary pseudonyms, Jane Duncan and Janet Sandison.

Much of her childhood was spent at her grandparents' croft, 'The Colony' (the 'Reachfar' of her novels), on the Black Isle. She attended Glasgow University and worked in a Photographic Intelligence Unit during World War II. A comfortable life in the Caribbean came to an end when her husband died, and at the age of 47 she was forced to write to pay his medical bills and to earn a living.

Jane's first novel was published in 1959, 'My friend Muriel', to be followed by many others, including eighteen 'My friend' novels in total. She also wrote for children in the 'Camerons' series and, right at the end of her life, collaborated with the illustrator Mairi Hedderwick on 'Herself and Janet Reachfar' and 'Janet Reachfar and the Kelpie'. Mairi Hedderwick went on to write about Katie Morag.

Jane Duncan died on 20th October 1976 and is buried in Kirkmichael graveyard on the Black Isle.

A new edition of 'My Friends the Miss Boyds' will be launched this summer (2010) to coincide with celebrations being organised on the Black Isle to mark the Jane Duncan Centenary. See the related link below for further details.

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'Camerons Calling' (2)

INVERNESS: Kilmorack

2000s

audio; novels; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Jane Duncan

This audio extract is from 'Camerons Calling' by Jane Duncan, published in 1966. It is read here by Elizabeth Parker. <br /> <br /> 'In lower Glen Cannich there stands the ruin of a church and nothing else except broad acres of pasture where hundreds of sheep graze, but in 1800 there was a whole township of little houses with a few acres of cultivated land round each of them. It was in 1804 that the Mr. Gordon who had won Strathdonan from Somerled Macdonald the Gambler 'cleared' this glen, the 'clearance' being the eviction of the people and the burning or pulling down of their houses so that the land could be put under grass for the sheep to eat, because Mr. Gordon could make more money out of sheep than he could make out of people. People, as Aunt told Neil, Donald and me when we first saw the ruined church, do not grow wool which can be made into cloth and sold for money and they cannot be slaughtered and eaten as mutton, so Mr. Gordon 'cleared' the people off his land. This was a thing that happened in many parts of the Highlands, the most notorious of all being the Sutherland Clearances, but Aunt has made something of a special study of the Vannich Clearances, and old Mr. Cameron was tremendously interested in all she could tell him and, after I took in their coffee, they went on talking and Aunt told me to chase Neil and Donald off upstairs.'<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Jane Cameron was born on 10th March 1910 in Renton, Dunbartonshire, the daughter of a police constable, Duncan Cameron. Her mother was Janet (Jessie) Sandison. From her parents' names she constructed her two literary pseudonyms, Jane Duncan and Janet Sandison.<br /> <br /> Much of her childhood was spent at her grandparents' croft, 'The Colony' (the 'Reachfar' of her novels), on the Black Isle. She attended Glasgow University and worked in a Photographic Intelligence Unit during World War II. A comfortable life in the Caribbean came to an end when her husband died, and at the age of 47 she was forced to write to pay his medical bills and to earn a living. <br /> <br /> Jane's first novel was published in 1959, 'My friend Muriel', to be followed by many others, including eighteen 'My friend' novels in total. She also wrote for children in the 'Camerons' series and, right at the end of her life, collaborated with the illustrator Mairi Hedderwick on 'Herself and Janet Reachfar' and 'Janet Reachfar and the Kelpie'. Mairi Hedderwick went on to write about Katie Morag.<br /> <br /> Jane Duncan died on 20th October 1976 and is buried in Kirkmichael graveyard on the Black Isle.<br /> <br /> A new edition of 'My Friends the Miss Boyds' will be launched this summer (2010) to coincide with celebrations being organised on the Black Isle to mark the Jane Duncan Centenary. See the related link below for further details.