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TITLE
Dun Carloway
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_01_029_0755
PLACENAME
Carloway
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Uig
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
The Highland Council Planning Department
ASSET ID
13688
KEYWORDS
brochs
archaeology
duns
buildings
Dun Carloway

Dun Carloway (Dùn Chàrlabhaigh), on the island of Lewis, is one of the best preserved brochs. It stands on a hillside overlooking Loch Roag and the ruins of blackhouses that may have been built using stone taken from it.

Dun Carloway was probably built around 50 BC. Surrounded by primitive dwellings with free ranging livestock it would have been used as a lookout tower. The tallest part still standing is 6.7m (22ft) high. The overall diameter is 14.3m (47ft), and the inner courtyard, with two side cells leading off, is 7.5m (24ft) across. Originally, the walls might have been about 13m (43ft) high. The double wall is well preserved and shows how tiers of galleries were linked by a stone staircase within the hollow wall.

Dun Carloway featured prominently in reports on Western Isles brochs in the late 19th century and became one of the first ancient monuments in Scotland to be taken into state care. By this time a large a part of the wall had been removed, possibly to build the blackhouses nearby. The site is now in the care of Historic Scotland.

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Dun Carloway

ROSS: Uig

1970s

brochs; archaeology; duns; buildings;

The Highland Council Planning Department

The Highland Council Planning Dept

Dun Carloway (Dùn Chàrlabhaigh), on the island of Lewis, is one of the best preserved brochs. It stands on a hillside overlooking Loch Roag and the ruins of blackhouses that may have been built using stone taken from it.<br /> <br /> Dun Carloway was probably built around 50 BC. Surrounded by primitive dwellings with free ranging livestock it would have been used as a lookout tower. The tallest part still standing is 6.7m (22ft) high. The overall diameter is 14.3m (47ft), and the inner courtyard, with two side cells leading off, is 7.5m (24ft) across. Originally, the walls might have been about 13m (43ft) high. The double wall is well preserved and shows how tiers of galleries were linked by a stone staircase within the hollow wall.<br /> <br /> Dun Carloway featured prominently in reports on Western Isles brochs in the late 19th century and became one of the first ancient monuments in Scotland to be taken into state care. By this time a large a part of the wall had been removed, possibly to build the blackhouses nearby. The site is now in the care of Historic Scotland.