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TITLE
'Letter from Reachfar' (2)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_JANE_DUNCAN_04
PLACENAME
Poyntzfield
DISTRICT
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Resolis
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Jane Duncan
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1370
KEYWORDS
audio
novels
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from 'Letter from Reachfar' by Jane Duncan, published in 1975. It is read here by a pupil from Fortrose Academy.

'About a mile from our post office which is also the village shop, there is a large, rather beautiful old house called Poyntzfield. This is an extraordinary name for a Highland house and it is said to have originated in this way. In the eighteenth century, the house and estate were called Ardoch, a much more likely name for this part of the country, and Ardoch was inherited by that not unusual creature in Scottish social history, a penniless lad wi' a lang pedigree who, like many more of his kind, went south to find himself a wealthy bride.'

Elizabeth Jane Cameron was born on 10th March 1910 in Renton, Dunbartonshire, the daughter of a police constable, Duncan Cameron. Her mother was Janet (Jessie) Sandison. From her parents' names she constructed her two literary pseudonyms, Jane Duncan and Janet Sandison.

Much of her childhood was spent at her grandparents' croft, 'The Colony' (the 'Reachfar' of her novels), on the Black Isle. She attended Glasgow University and worked in a Photographic Intelligence Unit during World War II. A comfortable life in the Caribbean came to an end when her husband died, and at the age of 47 she was forced to write to pay his medical bills and to earn a living.

Jane's first novel was published in 1959, 'My friend Muriel', to be followed by many others, including eighteen 'My friend' novels in total. She also wrote for children in the 'Camerons' series and, right at the end of her life, collaborated with the illustrator Mairi Hedderwick on 'Herself and Janet Reachfar' and 'Janet Reachfar and the Kelpie'. Mairi Hedderwick went on to write about Katie Morag.

Jane Duncan died on 20th October 1976 and is buried in Kirkmichael graveyard on the Black Isle.

A new edition of 'My Friends the Miss Boyds' will be launched this summer (2010) to coincide with celebrations being organised on the Black Isle to mark the Jane Duncan Centenary. See the related link below for further details.

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'Letter from Reachfar' (2)

ROSS: Resolis

2000s

audio; novels; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Jane Duncan

This audio extract is from 'Letter from Reachfar' by Jane Duncan, published in 1975. It is read here by a pupil from Fortrose Academy.<br /> <br /> 'About a mile from our post office which is also the village shop, there is a large, rather beautiful old house called Poyntzfield. This is an extraordinary name for a Highland house and it is said to have originated in this way. In the eighteenth century, the house and estate were called Ardoch, a much more likely name for this part of the country, and Ardoch was inherited by that not unusual creature in Scottish social history, a penniless lad wi' a lang pedigree who, like many more of his kind, went south to find himself a wealthy bride.'<br /> <br /> Elizabeth Jane Cameron was born on 10th March 1910 in Renton, Dunbartonshire, the daughter of a police constable, Duncan Cameron. Her mother was Janet (Jessie) Sandison. From her parents' names she constructed her two literary pseudonyms, Jane Duncan and Janet Sandison.<br /> <br /> Much of her childhood was spent at her grandparents' croft, 'The Colony' (the 'Reachfar' of her novels), on the Black Isle. She attended Glasgow University and worked in a Photographic Intelligence Unit during World War II. A comfortable life in the Caribbean came to an end when her husband died, and at the age of 47 she was forced to write to pay his medical bills and to earn a living. <br /> <br /> Jane's first novel was published in 1959, 'My friend Muriel', to be followed by many others, including eighteen 'My friend' novels in total. She also wrote for children in the 'Camerons' series and, right at the end of her life, collaborated with the illustrator Mairi Hedderwick on 'Herself and Janet Reachfar' and 'Janet Reachfar and the Kelpie'. Mairi Hedderwick went on to write about Katie Morag.<br /> <br /> Jane Duncan died on 20th October 1976 and is buried in Kirkmichael graveyard on the Black Isle.<br /> <br /> A new edition of 'My Friends the Miss Boyds' will be launched this summer (2010) to coincide with celebrations being organised on the Black Isle to mark the Jane Duncan Centenary. See the related link below for further details.