Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Celtic Cross at St Moluag's Church
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_01_031_0802
PLACENAME
Eoropie
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Barvas
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
The Highland Council Planning Department
ASSET ID
13708
KEYWORDS
churches
buildings
religion
memorials
monuments
World War 1
World War One
1st World War
Great War
Celtic Cross at St Moluag's Church

This Celtic Cross outside St Moluag's Church in Lewis is a War Memorial to the men who lost their lives in the First World War.

St Moluag's Church, or Teampull Moluaidh, stands in the village of Eoropaidh in the north of Lewis. It is dedicated to the 6th century Irish saint who was a contemporary of St Columba. It is a T-shaped building and has a small chapel on either side of the main building. It was a place of pilgrimage for people seeking healing. It has been suggested the one of the chapels, which can only be accessed from outside, was for those with diseases such a leprosy to be able to hear the sermons without coming into contact with the main congregation. The building had fallen into ruin by the 19th century and was restored in 1912. It is now part of the Scottish Episcopal Church.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Celtic Cross at St Moluag's Church

ROSS: Barvas

1970s

churches; buildings; religion; memorials; monuments; World War 1; World War One; 1st World War; Great War

The Highland Council Planning Department

The Highland Council Planning Dept

This Celtic Cross outside St Moluag's Church in Lewis is a War Memorial to the men who lost their lives in the First World War.<br /> <br /> St Moluag's Church, or Teampull Moluaidh, stands in the village of Eoropaidh in the north of Lewis. It is dedicated to the 6th century Irish saint who was a contemporary of St Columba. It is a T-shaped building and has a small chapel on either side of the main building. It was a place of pilgrimage for people seeking healing. It has been suggested the one of the chapels, which can only be accessed from outside, was for those with diseases such a leprosy to be able to hear the sermons without coming into contact with the main congregation. The building had fallen into ruin by the 19th century and was restored in 1912. It is now part of the Scottish Episcopal Church.