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TITLE
Kyle of Lochalsh pier
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_01_038_0970
PLACENAME
Kyle of Lochalsh
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
PERIOD
1960s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
The Highland Council Planning Department
ASSET ID
13726
KEYWORDS
railway station
jetty
freight train
Kyle of Lochalsh pier

The front of the station buildings at Kyle of Lochalsh are hidden behind rolling stock, and a crane sits poised at the end of the pier to transfer cargo from train to ship. The railway was extended from Stromeferry to Kyle in 1897, after difficult engineering work. It transformed the remote village in a few years to a busy port and railway terminus, with steamers docking at the pier carrying mail, freight and passengers, many of them tourists.

The girders in the foreground of the photograph are probably supports for an enlarged jetty which served the ferries crossing to Skye. As roads to the Highlands improved and more people owned their own car, the vehicle traffic using the ferry increased. Eventually a twenty-four hour service was in place but sailings ceased with the opening of the Skye Bridge on 16 October 1995, and the slipways once used by the car today provide launching facilities for leisure and cargo landing craft.

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Kyle of Lochalsh pier

ROSS: Lochalsh

1960s

railway station; jetty; freight train

The Highland Council Planning Department

The Highland Council Planning Dept

The front of the station buildings at Kyle of Lochalsh are hidden behind rolling stock, and a crane sits poised at the end of the pier to transfer cargo from train to ship. The railway was extended from Stromeferry to Kyle in 1897, after difficult engineering work. It transformed the remote village in a few years to a busy port and railway terminus, with steamers docking at the pier carrying mail, freight and passengers, many of them tourists.<br /> <br /> The girders in the foreground of the photograph are probably supports for an enlarged jetty which served the ferries crossing to Skye. As roads to the Highlands improved and more people owned their own car, the vehicle traffic using the ferry increased. Eventually a twenty-four hour service was in place but sailings ceased with the opening of the Skye Bridge on 16 October 1995, and the slipways once used by the car today provide launching facilities for leisure and cargo landing craft.