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TITLE
Kyle of Lochalsh Railway Station
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_01_038_0972
PLACENAME
Kyle of Lochalsh
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
The Highland Council Planning Department
ASSET ID
13727
KEYWORDS
station
siding
platforms
transport
Kyle of Lochalsh Railway Station

Often regarded as one of the most scenic railway journeys in Britain, the route from Inverness and Dingwall to the West coast took many years to complete, particularly the last few miles from Stromeferry to Kyle which involved very difficult engineering work. The terminus at Kyle was not opened until 1897. The engineering on the final part of the Kyle line made it the most expensive railway of the time, with 31 rock cuttings and 29 bridges built on this section alone, and the station itself in Kyle, goods yard, sidings and engine sheds, were all blasted out of solid rock.

A bus to Glenelg waits on the access road close to the platform of the station. In previous years a motor launch from Kyle jetty made the six mile journey by sea to Glenelg much quicker than the thirty miles by road.

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Kyle of Lochalsh Railway Station

ROSS: Lochalsh

1970s

station; siding; platforms; transport

The Highland Council Planning Department

The Highland Council Planning Dept

Often regarded as one of the most scenic railway journeys in Britain, the route from Inverness and Dingwall to the West coast took many years to complete, particularly the last few miles from Stromeferry to Kyle which involved very difficult engineering work. The terminus at Kyle was not opened until 1897. The engineering on the final part of the Kyle line made it the most expensive railway of the time, with 31 rock cuttings and 29 bridges built on this section alone, and the station itself in Kyle, goods yard, sidings and engine sheds, were all blasted out of solid rock.<br /> <br /> A bus to Glenelg waits on the access road close to the platform of the station. In previous years a motor launch from Kyle jetty made the six mile journey by sea to Glenelg much quicker than the thirty miles by road.