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TITLE
'The Highlands of Scotland' (3)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_NORMAN_NEWTON_03
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Norman Newton
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1422
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from 'The Highlands of Scotland', a pictorial volume published in 2000, with photography by Colin Baxter and text by Norman Newton. It is read here by Norman Newton.

'The three great mountains of Torridon have names familiar to Munro-baggers and hill-walkers everywhere: Beinn Alligin, Ben Eighe and, highest of all, Liathach. The Red Torridonian sandstone which makes up the bulk of Liathach and Ben Eighe is reckoned as being 750 million years old, while the white quartzite of their summit ridges is a mere 600 million years of age. Geologists, as well as climbers and hill-walkers, make their way to the mountain fortresses of Torridon in their pursuit of a wilderness experience unrivalled anywhere else in Scotland.'

Norman Newton was born in Glasgow but spent his teenage years in Nelson, New Zealand and attended college and university in the United States before returning to Scotland in 1971. He worked at Glasgow University Library for five years but since 1976 has worked in public libraries, firstly in Campbeltown, Argyll and since 1980 in Inverness. From 1992 to 1998 he was the Reference Librarian at Inverness Library and is now a Senior Librarian at the Library Support Unit, Harbour Road, Inverness, where he has responsibility for Reference and Information Services for the Highland Libraries network of over forty libraries.

Norman Newton has been involved in adult education and lifelong learning for over thirty years, lecturing to evening classes on a wide variety of local history topics. He has written a number of books on Scottish islands, most of which he has visited in the course of his teaching and research.

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'The Highlands of Scotland' (3)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Norman Newton

This audio extract is from 'The Highlands of Scotland', a pictorial volume published in 2000, with photography by Colin Baxter and text by Norman Newton. It is read here by Norman Newton. <br /> <br /> 'The three great mountains of Torridon have names familiar to Munro-baggers and hill-walkers everywhere: Beinn Alligin, Ben Eighe and, highest of all, Liathach. The Red Torridonian sandstone which makes up the bulk of Liathach and Ben Eighe is reckoned as being 750 million years old, while the white quartzite of their summit ridges is a mere 600 million years of age. Geologists, as well as climbers and hill-walkers, make their way to the mountain fortresses of Torridon in their pursuit of a wilderness experience unrivalled anywhere else in Scotland.'<br /> <br /> Norman Newton was born in Glasgow but spent his teenage years in Nelson, New Zealand and attended college and university in the United States before returning to Scotland in 1971. He worked at Glasgow University Library for five years but since 1976 has worked in public libraries, firstly in Campbeltown, Argyll and since 1980 in Inverness. From 1992 to 1998 he was the Reference Librarian at Inverness Library and is now a Senior Librarian at the Library Support Unit, Harbour Road, Inverness, where he has responsibility for Reference and Information Services for the Highland Libraries network of over forty libraries.<br /> <br /> Norman Newton has been involved in adult education and lifelong learning for over thirty years, lecturing to evening classes on a wide variety of local history topics. He has written a number of books on Scottish islands, most of which he has visited in the course of his teaching and research.