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TITLE
'A Hundred Years in the Highlands' (1)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_OSGOOD_MACKENZIE_01
PLACENAME
Inverewe
DISTRICT
Gairloch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Gairloch
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Osgood Mackenzie
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1424
KEYWORDS
mental health
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from chapter sixteen of 'A Hundred Years in the Highlands' by Osgood Mackenzie, first published in 1922. It is read by a pupil from Plockton High School.

'How well do I remember our country when all the lunatics were at large. There were no asylums and there was no cure except the great and only possible one of Loch Maree. The cure was still in vogue in my time. The patient was brought to the loch and put into a boat which made at once for the Holy Island, (Eilean Maree). Then a long rope was tied round the unlucky person's waist, and he or she was suddenly dropped into the water and dragged behind the boat three times round the island, taking...the way of the sun being a very important part of the cure. The crew rode for all they were worth, and if the patient was still alive and capable of swallowing anything, he was landed on the island, and as if he had not got already more than sufficient water inside him, he was made to swallow a lot more from...Saint Malruba's Holy Well. The awful shock and the fear of having it repeated did, I believe, occasionally subdue some of the most violent cases, but it was a cruel ordeal and quite an example of "kill or cure."

Osgood Mackenzie was the son of a Highland laird, Sir Francis Mackenzie, 5th Baronet of Gairloch. He is noted as the creator of Inverewe Gardens and the author of 'A hundred years in the Highlands'. He was born in Brittany in 1842, a Celtic environment exposed to the Gulf Stream, which he likened to the west coast of Scotland.

'A hundred years in the Highlands' is part family memoir, depicting the lives of the Highland gentry, and partly a portrayal of Highland custom and folklore.

In 1862 Osgood inherited Inverewe, a barren, exposed headland with one tree. Until his death in 1922 he expended considerable effort and expense transforming this unpromising environment into a celebrated garden, housing exotic plants from as far afield as the Himalayas. Work has continued since Osgood Mackenzie's death and in 1952 the Inverewe Gardens passed to the National Trust for Scotland.

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'A Hundred Years in the Highlands' (1)

ROSS: Gairloch

2000s

mental health; audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Osgood Mackenzie

This audio extract is from chapter sixteen of 'A Hundred Years in the Highlands' by Osgood Mackenzie, first published in 1922. It is read by a pupil from Plockton High School.<br /> <br /> 'How well do I remember our country when all the lunatics were at large. There were no asylums and there was no cure except the great and only possible one of Loch Maree. The cure was still in vogue in my time. The patient was brought to the loch and put into a boat which made at once for the Holy Island, (Eilean Maree). Then a long rope was tied round the unlucky person's waist, and he or she was suddenly dropped into the water and dragged behind the boat three times round the island, taking...the way of the sun being a very important part of the cure. The crew rode for all they were worth, and if the patient was still alive and capable of swallowing anything, he was landed on the island, and as if he had not got already more than sufficient water inside him, he was made to swallow a lot more from...Saint Malruba's Holy Well. The awful shock and the fear of having it repeated did, I believe, occasionally subdue some of the most violent cases, but it was a cruel ordeal and quite an example of "kill or cure."<br /> <br /> Osgood Mackenzie was the son of a Highland laird, Sir Francis Mackenzie, 5th Baronet of Gairloch. He is noted as the creator of Inverewe Gardens and the author of 'A hundred years in the Highlands'. He was born in Brittany in 1842, a Celtic environment exposed to the Gulf Stream, which he likened to the west coast of Scotland.<br /> <br /> 'A hundred years in the Highlands' is part family memoir, depicting the lives of the Highland gentry, and partly a portrayal of Highland custom and folklore.<br /> <br /> In 1862 Osgood inherited Inverewe, a barren, exposed headland with one tree. Until his death in 1922 he expended considerable effort and expense transforming this unpromising environment into a celebrated garden, housing exotic plants from as far afield as the Himalayas. Work has continued since Osgood Mackenzie's death and in 1952 the Inverewe Gardens passed to the National Trust for Scotland.