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TITLE
'A Hundred Years in the Highlands' (2)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_OSGOOD_MACKENZIE_02
PLACENAME
Inverewe
DISTRICT
Gairloch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Gairloch
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Osgood Mackenzie
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1425
KEYWORDS
potato famine
audio
literary landscapes

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This audio extract is from chapter three of 'A Hundred Years in the Highlands' by Osgood Mackenzie, first published in 1922. It is read by a pupil from Plockton High School.

'I cannot say I can remember my first coming to Gairloch, as I was only two years old but there were soon to be very trying times there, during the great famine caused by the potato blight. I have quite clear recollections of my own small grievance at being made to eat rice, which I detested, instead of potatoes, with my mutton and chicken in the years 1846-1848, for even 'Uaislean an tigh mhor' (the gentry of the big house) could not get enough potatoes to eat in those hard times. Certainly things looked very black in 1846-1848 in Ireland and the West of Scotland, though, but for the potato blight, when should we have got roads made through the country? My mother never left Gairloch, not even for a day, for the three long years when the famine was at its height.'

Osgood Mackenzie was the son of a Highland laird, Sir Francis Mackenzie, 5th Baronet of Gairloch. He is noted as the creator of Inverewe Gardens and the author of 'A hundred years in the Highlands'. He was born in Brittany in 1842, a Celtic environment exposed to the Gulf Stream, which he likened to the west coast of Scotland.

'A hundred years in the Highlands' is part family memoir, depicting the lives of the Highland gentry, and partly a portrayal of Highland custom and folklore.

In 1862 Osgood inherited Inverewe, a barren, exposed headland with one tree. Until his death in 1922 he expended considerable effort and expense transforming this unpromising environment into a celebrated garden, housing exotic plants from as far afield as the Himalayas. Work has continued since Osgood Mackenzie's death and in 1952 the Inverewe Gardens passed to the National Trust for Scotland.

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'A Hundred Years in the Highlands' (2)

ROSS: Gairloch

2000s

potato famine; audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Osgood Mackenzie

This audio extract is from chapter three of 'A Hundred Years in the Highlands' by Osgood Mackenzie, first published in 1922. It is read by a pupil from Plockton High School.<br /> <br /> 'I cannot say I can remember my first coming to Gairloch, as I was only two years old but there were soon to be very trying times there, during the great famine caused by the potato blight. I have quite clear recollections of my own small grievance at being made to eat rice, which I detested, instead of potatoes, with my mutton and chicken in the years 1846-1848, for even 'Uaislean an tigh mhor' (the gentry of the big house) could not get enough potatoes to eat in those hard times. Certainly things looked very black in 1846-1848 in Ireland and the West of Scotland, though, but for the potato blight, when should we have got roads made through the country? My mother never left Gairloch, not even for a day, for the three long years when the famine was at its height.'<br /> <br /> Osgood Mackenzie was the son of a Highland laird, Sir Francis Mackenzie, 5th Baronet of Gairloch. He is noted as the creator of Inverewe Gardens and the author of 'A hundred years in the Highlands'. He was born in Brittany in 1842, a Celtic environment exposed to the Gulf Stream, which he likened to the west coast of Scotland.<br /> <br /> 'A hundred years in the Highlands' is part family memoir, depicting the lives of the Highland gentry, and partly a portrayal of Highland custom and folklore.<br /> <br /> In 1862 Osgood inherited Inverewe, a barren, exposed headland with one tree. Until his death in 1922 he expended considerable effort and expense transforming this unpromising environment into a celebrated garden, housing exotic plants from as far afield as the Himalayas. Work has continued since Osgood Mackenzie's death and in 1952 the Inverewe Gardens passed to the National Trust for Scotland.