Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
'An Ocean Apart' (2)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_ROBIN_PILCHER_02
DATE OF RECORDING
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Robin Pilcher
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1430
KEYWORDS
audio
literary landscapes

Get Adobe Flash player

This audio extract is from 'An Ocean Apart' by Robin Pilcher, first published in 1999. It is read here by the author.

'Two miles before Aberlour, David turned right and crossed a high iron-latticed bridge that spanned the river, then immediately swung left past the large brown sign which bore the name GLENDURNICH DISTILLERIES LTD. in gold lettering. The road had at one time twisted down the hill to the riverside in a series of hairpin bends, but had to be re-routed to allow easier access for the long and unwieldly triple-axeled lorries that delivered bulk malt from the maltings at Inverness, and took off the casks of mature whisky to the bottling plant near Glasgow. Now it descended in one huge sweep, yet so designed to still leave the distillery completely hidden behind the screen of densely planted fir-trees, save for the two pagoda-style chimneys, the characteristic emblem of all Scotch malt distilleries, that sat over the old kiln-house and jutted their arrowhead-shaped tips above the cover.

Rounding the bend, he left the shelter of the trees and at once the distillery came into view below him. Set in a fifteen-acre site, it stretched out on a plateau twenty feet above the river, bounded by a series of tarmacked roads which in turn, were boarded by a wide expanse of newly mown banks and lawns interpersed with bright well-kept flower-beds. The road dropped down the incline, so that David began at the same level as the roofs of the four maturation warehouses before decending to the plateau and driving alongside the original stone-built still-house and mash-house with their small white irregular windows, and then on past the malt silos to the new office block at the far end of the complex.

He pulled the Audi into the car-park and picked a space as close as possible to the main reception door. He turned off the ignition key, silencing both the engine and the radio simultaneously and, unclipping his seat-belt, he opened the door and got out. For a moment, he stood looking over towards the offices and found himself almost immediately stretching his arms high above his head to counteract an almost purile sense of nervousness. He shook his head at the idiocy and walked around to the other side of the car where his father was already pushing himself to his feet with the aid of his stick. Putting a hand under his tweedy armpit, he gently heaved him upright, and the old man stood for a minute preparing himself for the first step.

He looked at David. ' Ready?'

David smiled and nodded.

'Right. Well, let's make an entrance.'

Robin Pilcher was born in Dundee on 10th August 1950, the second child of Graham, a director of the family jute business, and the novelist Rosamunde Pilcher. He attended school in Dunfermline and Bristol before finally returning home to complete his education at Dundee College of Commerce.

Robin has worked as a cowboy, an assistant film cameraman, a farmer, a public relations and marketing consultant and a tennis coach. His first book, 'An Ocean Apart' (1999) sold to 11 countries and reached the lower echelons of the best-seller lists in the UK and the USA. This was followed in 2002 by 'Starting Over', which reached number 9 in the New York Times Bestseller Lists, and 'A Risk Worth Taking' in February 2004. All three books have been adapted for television. Robin's latest book 'Starburst' (2007) is set around the annual Edinburgh Festival.

Robin and his wife Kirsty divide their time between Scotland and Spain. Robin is a keen player of golf and tennis, and when the mood takes him he still picks up his guitar to strum out a ballad.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

'An Ocean Apart' (2)

2000s

audio; literary landscapes

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Robin Pilcher

This audio extract is from 'An Ocean Apart' by Robin Pilcher, first published in 1999. It is read here by the author.<br /> <br /> 'Two miles before Aberlour, David turned right and crossed a high iron-latticed bridge that spanned the river, then immediately swung left past the large brown sign which bore the name GLENDURNICH DISTILLERIES LTD. in gold lettering. The road had at one time twisted down the hill to the riverside in a series of hairpin bends, but had to be re-routed to allow easier access for the long and unwieldly triple-axeled lorries that delivered bulk malt from the maltings at Inverness, and took off the casks of mature whisky to the bottling plant near Glasgow. Now it descended in one huge sweep, yet so designed to still leave the distillery completely hidden behind the screen of densely planted fir-trees, save for the two pagoda-style chimneys, the characteristic emblem of all Scotch malt distilleries, that sat over the old kiln-house and jutted their arrowhead-shaped tips above the cover.<br /> <br /> Rounding the bend, he left the shelter of the trees and at once the distillery came into view below him. Set in a fifteen-acre site, it stretched out on a plateau twenty feet above the river, bounded by a series of tarmacked roads which in turn, were boarded by a wide expanse of newly mown banks and lawns interpersed with bright well-kept flower-beds. The road dropped down the incline, so that David began at the same level as the roofs of the four maturation warehouses before decending to the plateau and driving alongside the original stone-built still-house and mash-house with their small white irregular windows, and then on past the malt silos to the new office block at the far end of the complex.<br /> <br /> He pulled the Audi into the car-park and picked a space as close as possible to the main reception door. He turned off the ignition key, silencing both the engine and the radio simultaneously and, unclipping his seat-belt, he opened the door and got out. For a moment, he stood looking over towards the offices and found himself almost immediately stretching his arms high above his head to counteract an almost purile sense of nervousness. He shook his head at the idiocy and walked around to the other side of the car where his father was already pushing himself to his feet with the aid of his stick. Putting a hand under his tweedy armpit, he gently heaved him upright, and the old man stood for a minute preparing himself for the first step.<br /> <br /> He looked at David. ' Ready?'<br /> <br /> David smiled and nodded.<br /> <br /> 'Right. Well, let's make an entrance.'<br /> <br /> Robin Pilcher was born in Dundee on 10th August 1950, the second child of Graham, a director of the family jute business, and the novelist Rosamunde Pilcher. He attended school in Dunfermline and Bristol before finally returning home to complete his education at Dundee College of Commerce.<br /> <br /> Robin has worked as a cowboy, an assistant film cameraman, a farmer, a public relations and marketing consultant and a tennis coach. His first book, 'An Ocean Apart' (1999) sold to 11 countries and reached the lower echelons of the best-seller lists in the UK and the USA. This was followed in 2002 by 'Starting Over', which reached number 9 in the New York Times Bestseller Lists, and 'A Risk Worth Taking' in February 2004. All three books have been adapted for television. Robin's latest book 'Starburst' (2007) is set around the annual Edinburgh Festival.<br /> <br /> Robin and his wife Kirsty divide their time between Scotland and Spain. Robin is a keen player of golf and tennis, and when the mood takes him he still picks up his guitar to strum out a ballad.