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TITLE
Memories of a Lovat Scout (3)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LOVAT_SCOUT_ROD_CAMPBELL_03
PLACENAME
Faroe Islands
DATE OF RECORDING
2007
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Roddie Campbell
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1456
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
wars
Armed Forces
army
battalions
regiments
campaign
campaigns
battles
military
audio

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Roddie Campbell of Tollie of Brahan Croft, Lochussie, is one of the last few surviving Lovat Scouts. In this audio recording he talks about the Faroese people (1940-42). (The image shows the Lovat Scouts camp at Fearn, 1904.)

Interviewer: And you liked the Faroese people?

Roddie: Oh, they were lovely people an no crime or anything, aye.

Mary: But ye were bombed, weren't ye?

Roddie: Hmmm?

Mary: Were ye bombed when ye were in the Faroes? Did the Germans come an attack you?

Roddie: Och, yes. There's some that did, aye. An we'd nothing but Bren guns to support ourselves, aye, till near when we was leaving - '42 when we came home. Mm-hmm. But they had guns then, besides Bren guns.

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Roddie: Aye. Mm-hmm.

Interviewer: What's a Bren gun?

Roddie: It's jist a machine gun - a very, very good machine gun. I think it shot fifteen bullets in a second or something like that. But they were - I mean they werena heavy enough to take doon a plane, but we did take one down, aye.

Mary: Remember that chappie MacVicar - he was here with Angie and Louis Cameron?

Roddie: Naw, Ah canna mind.

Mary: He was always on a boat, wasn't he? An as well as being a fluent Gaelic speaker he always spoke fluent Faroese. Is that right?

Roddie: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.

Mary: I thought I heard that, but he was here -

Roddie: If they had Gaelic they could speak to the, you know, the Faroese language very good, aye.

Interviewer: So the Gaelic made it easier for them to - ?

Roddie: Oh it was. It was just the same, ye know -

Mary; It might have been, yes.

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Roddie: Mm-hmm, there were a whole company o Gaelic speaking people, aye.

Interviewer: Do you have any Gaelic?

Roddie: Not a word.

Interviewer: No.

Roddie: Not even a swear. No.

Interviewer: Uh-huh.

Roddie: But the swears was all probably the same.

Interviewer: Yeh, yeh. No doubt.

Roddie: Mm-hmm. But they were really nice people, aye, and we - there were an old man there - well he wasn't old but he was a cobbler - and he went to sweem every day, he swimmed every day and we go to know him. We - quite a lot of us went every day to sweem - summer and winter - the two winters we wis there.

Interviewer: Did you do any other sports while you were there to keep yourselves - ?

Roddie: Yes.

Interviewer: Football or ?

Roddie: We played football.

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

Roddie: But it was that rough an all that that ye couldna do anything else. We did a little shootin of the birds an things but not much, an we had a range - ye know - a shooting range.

Now part of the 7th Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland, the Lovat Scouts were first formed for service in the Second Boer War in 1900 by the 16th Lord Lovat, Simon Joseph Fraser. After the war, in 1903, two regiments were formed - the 1st and 2nd Lovat Scouts. Skilled in marksmanship, field craft and military tactics, the two regiments were involved extensively in World War I. One regiment was disbanded in 1922. During World War II, Lovat Scouts were garrisoned in the Faroe Islands before seeing active service in Italy from 1944 to the end of the war.

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Memories of a Lovat Scout (3)

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; wars; Armed Forces; army; battalions; regiments; campaign; campaigns; battles; military; audio

Am Baile

Am Baile: Memories of a Lovat Scout

Roddie Campbell of Tollie of Brahan Croft, Lochussie, is one of the last few surviving Lovat Scouts. In this audio recording he talks about the Faroese people (1940-42). (The image shows the Lovat Scouts camp at Fearn, 1904.)<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And you liked the Faroese people? <br /> <br /> Roddie: Oh, they were lovely people an no crime or anything, aye.<br /> <br /> Mary: But ye were bombed, weren't ye?<br /> <br /> Roddie: Hmmm?<br /> <br /> Mary: Were ye bombed when ye were in the Faroes? Did the Germans come an attack you?<br /> <br /> Roddie: Och, yes. There's some that did, aye. An we'd nothing but Bren guns to support ourselves, aye, till near when we was leaving - '42 when we came home. Mm-hmm. But they had guns then, besides Bren guns.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mm-hmm. <br /> <br /> Roddie: Aye. Mm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What's a Bren gun?<br /> <br /> Roddie: It's jist a machine gun - a very, very good machine gun. I think it shot fifteen bullets in a second or something like that. But they were - I mean they werena heavy enough to take doon a plane, but we did take one down, aye.<br /> <br /> Mary: Remember that chappie MacVicar - he was here with Angie and Louis Cameron?<br /> <br /> Roddie: Naw, Ah canna mind. <br /> <br /> Mary: He was always on a boat, wasn't he? An as well as being a fluent Gaelic speaker he always spoke fluent Faroese. Is that right?<br /> <br /> Roddie: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Mary: I thought I heard that, but he was here - <br /> <br /> Roddie: If they had Gaelic they could speak to the, you know, the Faroese language very good, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So the Gaelic made it easier for them to - ?<br /> <br /> Roddie: Oh it was. It was just the same, ye know -<br /> <br /> Mary; It might have been, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Roddie: Mm-hmm, there were a whole company o Gaelic speaking people, aye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Do you have any Gaelic?<br /> <br /> Roddie: Not a word. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: No.<br /> <br /> Roddie: Not even a swear. No.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Uh-huh.<br /> <br /> Roddie: But the swears was all probably the same.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yeh, yeh. No doubt.<br /> <br /> Roddie: Mm-hmm. But they were really nice people, aye, and we - there were an old man there - well he wasn't old but he was a cobbler - and he went to sweem every day, he swimmed every day and we go to know him. We - quite a lot of us went every day to sweem - summer and winter - the two winters we wis there.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you do any other sports while you were there to keep yourselves - ?<br /> <br /> Roddie: Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Football or ?<br /> <br /> Roddie: We played football.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mm-hmm.<br /> <br /> Roddie: But it was that rough an all that that ye couldna do anything else. We did a little shootin of the birds an things but not much, an we had a range - ye know - a shooting range.<br /> <br /> Now part of the 7th Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland, the Lovat Scouts were first formed for service in the Second Boer War in 1900 by the 16th Lord Lovat, Simon Joseph Fraser. After the war, in 1903, two regiments were formed - the 1st and 2nd Lovat Scouts. Skilled in marksmanship, field craft and military tactics, the two regiments were involved extensively in World War I. One regiment was disbanded in 1922. During World War II, Lovat Scouts were garrisoned in the Faroe Islands before seeing active service in Italy from 1944 to the end of the war.