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TITLE
Portree Harbour, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_03_047_0130
PLACENAME
Portree
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
Highland Council Planning Dept.
ASSET ID
14657
KEYWORDS
harbours
houses
Portree Harbour, Skye

This view of Portree was taken from the pier and shows some of the older buildings situated close to the harbour. Beaumont Crescent, fronting the shore on the left, dates from the 1830s. The curving elevated terrace of houses behind on Mill Road is named Bosville Terrace. The name is linked to the first Lord Macdonald through his wife Elizabeth Diana Bosville. The land behind is now dotted with houses and the corn and wool mill to which the road name alludes has also been converted into a home.

A timber framework for drying fishing nets can be seen on the shore below Cuddy Point, from the Gaelic for juvenile Coalfish,"cudaige", a common catch for local boys fishing off the rocks.

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Portree Harbour, Skye

INVERNESS: Portree

1970s

harbours; houses

Highland Council Planning Dept.

The Highland Council Planning Dept

This view of Portree was taken from the pier and shows some of the older buildings situated close to the harbour. Beaumont Crescent, fronting the shore on the left, dates from the 1830s. The curving elevated terrace of houses behind on Mill Road is named Bosville Terrace. The name is linked to the first Lord Macdonald through his wife Elizabeth Diana Bosville. The land behind is now dotted with houses and the corn and wool mill to which the road name alludes has also been converted into a home.<br /> <br /> A timber framework for drying fishing nets can be seen on the shore below Cuddy Point, from the Gaelic for juvenile Coalfish,"cudaige", a common catch for local boys fishing off the rocks.