Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Information plaque at the Plock of Kyle
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_04_008_0825
PLACENAME
Kyle of Lochalsh
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
The Highland Council Planning Department
ASSET ID
14816
KEYWORDS
viewpoints
plaques
tourist information
Information plaque at the Plock of Kyle

The Plock or Ploc of Kyle is an irregular-shaped peninsula, about 2.5 km², which overlooks the straits to Kyleakin on the Isle of Skye. The name is derived from the Gaelic 'Am Ploc', meaning a lump.

The viewpoint remains an amenity for the village of Kyle of Lochalsh thanks to the benevolence of Sir Daniel Hamilton, one of the landowners of the Lochalsh Estate, who donated the land for public use. The panoramic view from the Plock, with the Skye Bridge below, takes in the Cuillin mountain range on Skye. The mountains in view are named on the plaque, from Glamaig on the right to Beinn Dearg Bheag on the left.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Information plaque at the Plock of Kyle

ROSS: Lochalsh

1970s

viewpoints; plaques; tourist information

The Highland Council Planning Department

The Highland Council Planning Dept

The Plock or Ploc of Kyle is an irregular-shaped peninsula, about 2.5 km², which overlooks the straits to Kyleakin on the Isle of Skye. The name is derived from the Gaelic 'Am Ploc', meaning a lump. <br /> <br /> The viewpoint remains an amenity for the village of Kyle of Lochalsh thanks to the benevolence of Sir Daniel Hamilton, one of the landowners of the Lochalsh Estate, who donated the land for public use. The panoramic view from the Plock, with the Skye Bridge below, takes in the Cuillin mountain range on Skye. The mountains in view are named on the plaque, from Glamaig on the right to Beinn Dearg Bheag on the left.