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TITLE
Aigas Field Centre
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_04_017_0112
PLACENAME
Crask of Aigas
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmorack
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
The Highland Council Planning Department
ASSET ID
14922
KEYWORDS
houses
buildings
education
Aigas Field Centre

Aigas House dates from around the 1760s and was the home of the owners of the Aigas Estate near Beauly. In the 1870s it was taken over by a Glasgow merchant family who took it as their summer sporting lodge. It was around this time that the impressive Victoria façade was built. In the 1950s it became a council run old peoples home but it was abandoned in 1971.

Sir John Lister-Kaye bought the house, then on the verge of demolition, in 1976 and turned it into a home and field studies centre. The Aigas Field Centre continues to run wildlife courses and holidays and the house's impressive gardens are also opened to the public twice a year to raise money for Highland Hospice.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Aigas Field Centre

INVERNESS: Kilmorack

1970s

houses; buildings; education;

The Highland Council Planning Department

The Highland Council Planning Dept

Aigas House dates from around the 1760s and was the home of the owners of the Aigas Estate near Beauly. In the 1870s it was taken over by a Glasgow merchant family who took it as their summer sporting lodge. It was around this time that the impressive Victoria façade was built. In the 1950s it became a council run old peoples home but it was abandoned in 1971. <br /> <br /> Sir John Lister-Kaye bought the house, then on the verge of demolition, in 1976 and turned it into a home and field studies centre. The Aigas Field Centre continues to run wildlife courses and holidays and the house's impressive gardens are also opened to the public twice a year to raise money for Highland Hospice.