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TITLE
What would you put in your emigrant's kist? - Andrew Mackillop
EXTERNAL ID
AB_SGI_07_ANDREW_MACKILLOP_Q_06
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Andrew Mackillop
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1498
KEYWORDS
conferences
emigration
lecturers
audio
audios
emigrantkist

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As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad.

Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Andrew Mackillop answers the question:

'If you were emigrating today and your luggage restriction was a typical emigrant's kist what would you put in it?' (A typical kist would be approx. 96cm x 51cm x 56cm.)

'What would I put in it? Well, if I was assuming I was emigrating with my family, I would, I would still take pictures of my family from where I was from. So I would take pictures of my family in, showing that we were in Harris, or Aberdeen, where I live with my, my own family. I would take my signed, or a signed copy from my grandmother, of a bible, and I would take my ipod, and that would probably be enough.

Interviewer: You don't need a kist then!

I don't really need a kist. I think, travel light - that would be my - Oh, no, I would take my books...

Interviewer: Your books?

...as well. That would probably expand it significantly, but apart from that not much else. I don't think there's much else.'


BIOGRAPHY

Dr Andrew Mackillop is a lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Aberdeen. Publications on Highland history include: 'More Fruitful than the Soil': Army, Empire and the Scottish Highlands, 1715-1815 (East Linton, 2000) and 'The Political Culture of the Scottish Highlands from Culloden to Waterloo', The Historical Journal, 46 (2003). His research interests currently centre upon the differing experiences of the Scots, Irish and Welsh in the Asian hemisphere of British imperialism during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

His most recent publication, 'A Union for Empire? Scotland, the English East India Company and the British Union', Scottish Historical Review, 87 (2008) will be followed at the end of this year by, "A Reticent People?': The Welsh in Asia, 1700-1815', in Huw Bowen (ed.), Wales and the British Empire (Manchester, 2009) and, as co-editor with Micheál O' Siochrú, Forging the State: European State Formation and the Anglo-Scottish Union of 1707 (Dundee, 2009).

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What would you put in your emigrant's kist? - Andrew Mackillop

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

conferences; emigration; lecturers; audio; audios; emigrantkist;

Am Baile

Scotland's Global Impact

As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad. <br /> <br /> Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Andrew Mackillop answers the question:<br /> <br /> 'If you were emigrating today and your luggage restriction was a typical emigrant's kist what would you put in it?' (A typical kist would be approx. 96cm x 51cm x 56cm.)<br /> <br /> 'What would I put in it? Well, if I was assuming I was emigrating with my family, I would, I would still take pictures of my family from where I was from. So I would take pictures of my family in, showing that we were in Harris, or Aberdeen, where I live with my, my own family. I would take my signed, or a signed copy from my grandmother, of a bible, and I would take my ipod, and that would probably be enough.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You don't need a kist then!<br /> <br /> I don't really need a kist. I think, travel light - that would be my - Oh, no, I would take my books...<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Your books?<br /> <br /> ...as well. That would probably expand it significantly, but apart from that not much else. I don't think there's much else.'<br /> <br /> <br /> BIOGRAPHY<br /> <br /> Dr Andrew Mackillop is a lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Aberdeen. Publications on Highland history include: 'More Fruitful than the Soil': Army, Empire and the Scottish Highlands, 1715-1815 (East Linton, 2000) and 'The Political Culture of the Scottish Highlands from Culloden to Waterloo', The Historical Journal, 46 (2003). His research interests currently centre upon the differing experiences of the Scots, Irish and Welsh in the Asian hemisphere of British imperialism during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. <br /> <br /> His most recent publication, 'A Union for Empire? Scotland, the English East India Company and the British Union', Scottish Historical Review, 87 (2008) will be followed at the end of this year by, "A Reticent People?': The Welsh in Asia, 1700-1815', in Huw Bowen (ed.), Wales and the British Empire (Manchester, 2009) and, as co-editor with Micheál O' Siochrú, Forging the State: European State Formation and the Anglo-Scottish Union of 1707 (Dundee, 2009).