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TITLE
What fired your interest in your subject? - Angela McCarthy
EXTERNAL ID
AB_SGI_08_ANGELA_MCCARTHY_Q_02
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Angela McCarthy
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1500
KEYWORDS
conferences
emigration
lecturers
audio
audios
subjectinterest

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As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad.

Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Professor Angela McCarthy answers the question:

'What fired your interest in your particular area of expertise?'

'I think really it relates to this vanished grandfather who had disappeared off the face of the earth and we went back to Ireland to try and find, sort of, any trace of him, and had very bare-bone material in terms of where he had come from, names, etc., so we actually ended up knocking on various doors in different parts of Cork - starting off in Macroom, going to a place called Ballyvourney, and then moving on to Millstreet. And the various people we met we picked up further bits of information as to who might be able to help, and eventually we got to a house that belonged to his brother and found out he had died six months earlier. So that was a real pity to have missed him but he had, obviously, family there in Ireland and I ended up staying there, doing all of my study there, and the migration aspect I think really connects with that story - that I got interested in that. And then looked at Irish migrants who moved to New Zealand; their letters that were exchanged, as part of my PhD thesis and then moved to the Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies at the University of Aberdeen. So that then brought in the Scottish side of things with a comparative project I did there looking at Irish and Scottish migration in the twentieth century. And really that migration theme has just continued in terms of now looking at patients, migrants who ended up in lunatic asylums in New Zealand.'


BIOGRAPHY

Angela McCarthy is Professor of Scottish and Irish History at the University of Otago, where she teaches courses on Scottish history and Scottish and Irish migration. She is the author or editor of numerous books and articles on Scottish migration, including 'Personal Narratives of Irish and Scottish Migration, 1921-65: For Spirit and Adventure' (2007) and 'A Global Clan: Scottish Migrant Networks and Identities Since the Eighteenth Century' (2006).

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What fired your interest in your subject? - Angela McCarthy

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

conferences; emigration; lecturers; audio; audios; subjectinterest;

Am Baile

Scotland's Global Impact

As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad. <br /> <br /> Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Professor Angela McCarthy answers the question:<br /> <br /> 'What fired your interest in your particular area of expertise?'<br /> <br /> 'I think really it relates to this vanished grandfather who had disappeared off the face of the earth and we went back to Ireland to try and find, sort of, any trace of him, and had very bare-bone material in terms of where he had come from, names, etc., so we actually ended up knocking on various doors in different parts of Cork - starting off in Macroom, going to a place called Ballyvourney, and then moving on to Millstreet. And the various people we met we picked up further bits of information as to who might be able to help, and eventually we got to a house that belonged to his brother and found out he had died six months earlier. So that was a real pity to have missed him but he had, obviously, family there in Ireland and I ended up staying there, doing all of my study there, and the migration aspect I think really connects with that story - that I got interested in that. And then looked at Irish migrants who moved to New Zealand; their letters that were exchanged, as part of my PhD thesis and then moved to the Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies at the University of Aberdeen. So that then brought in the Scottish side of things with a comparative project I did there looking at Irish and Scottish migration in the twentieth century. And really that migration theme has just continued in terms of now looking at patients, migrants who ended up in lunatic asylums in New Zealand.'<br /> <br /> <br /> BIOGRAPHY<br /> <br /> Angela McCarthy is Professor of Scottish and Irish History at the University of Otago, where she teaches courses on Scottish history and Scottish and Irish migration. She is the author or editor of numerous books and articles on Scottish migration, including 'Personal Narratives of Irish and Scottish Migration, 1921-65: For Spirit and Adventure' (2007) and 'A Global Clan: Scottish Migrant Networks and Identities Since the Eighteenth Century' (2006).