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TITLE
What did you speak about at Scotland's Global Impact? - Angela McCarthy
EXTERNAL ID
AB_SGI_08_ANGELA_MCCARTHY_Q_03
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Angela McCarthy
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1501
KEYWORDS
conferences
emigration
lecturers
audio
audios
speakabout

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As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad.

Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Professor Angela McCarthy answers the question:

'Could you give a brief summary of what you spoke about at the conference?'

'I spoke on this new research project which essentially is looking at the experiences of foreign-born migrants, as well as New Zealand-born patients as well, who entered lunatic asylums in New Zealand and also in Australia. So it's a comparative project involving myself, a colleague at the University of Waikato, Kathy Coleborne, who's a specialist in the history of medicine, and also a couple of postgraduate students, and a research assistant as well. So it's sort of quite a large project. And I spoke about the material that we're using, such as casebooks of the patients who ended up in these asylums, and the demographic data that these casebooks provide such as the age, marital status, religion - that type of thing - and we'll be able with the database to reference, cross-match a range of variables and work out different patterns and how the Scots might compare. At the moment the published statistics indicate that the Scots were entering asylums in terms of their representation in the New Zealand population, the Irish were over-represented and the English were under-represented. So that's quite interesting; that whole issue and why that actually is. And really I then in the paper touched on aspects of the voyage out and how that comes through in some of the casebook testimony as a potential cause for why migrants ended up in the asylum. And also then just looked at issues of their ethnic identity and I mentioned language as one particular issue and also some references to Robert Burns that appeared on the asylum records as well, you know, this being the 250th anniversary.'


BIOGRAPHY

Angela McCarthy is Professor of Scottish and Irish History at the University of Otago, where she teaches courses on Scottish history and Scottish and Irish migration. She is the author or editor of numerous books and articles on Scottish migration, including 'Personal Narratives of Irish and Scottish Migration, 1921-65: For Spirit and Adventure' (2007) and 'A Global Clan: Scottish Migrant Networks and Identities Since the Eighteenth Century' (2006).

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What did you speak about at Scotland's Global Impact? - Angela McCarthy

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

conferences; emigration; lecturers; audio; audios; speakabout;

Am Baile

Scotland's Global Impact

As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad. <br /> <br /> Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Professor Angela McCarthy answers the question:<br /> <br /> 'Could you give a brief summary of what you spoke about at the conference?'<br /> <br /> 'I spoke on this new research project which essentially is looking at the experiences of foreign-born migrants, as well as New Zealand-born patients as well, who entered lunatic asylums in New Zealand and also in Australia. So it's a comparative project involving myself, a colleague at the University of Waikato, Kathy Coleborne, who's a specialist in the history of medicine, and also a couple of postgraduate students, and a research assistant as well. So it's sort of quite a large project. And I spoke about the material that we're using, such as casebooks of the patients who ended up in these asylums, and the demographic data that these casebooks provide such as the age, marital status, religion - that type of thing - and we'll be able with the database to reference, cross-match a range of variables and work out different patterns and how the Scots might compare. At the moment the published statistics indicate that the Scots were entering asylums in terms of their representation in the New Zealand population, the Irish were over-represented and the English were under-represented. So that's quite interesting; that whole issue and why that actually is. And really I then in the paper touched on aspects of the voyage out and how that comes through in some of the casebook testimony as a potential cause for why migrants ended up in the asylum. And also then just looked at issues of their ethnic identity and I mentioned language as one particular issue and also some references to Robert Burns that appeared on the asylum records as well, you know, this being the 250th anniversary.'<br /> <br /> <br /> BIOGRAPHY<br /> <br /> Angela McCarthy is Professor of Scottish and Irish History at the University of Otago, where she teaches courses on Scottish history and Scottish and Irish migration. She is the author or editor of numerous books and articles on Scottish migration, including 'Personal Narratives of Irish and Scottish Migration, 1921-65: For Spirit and Adventure' (2007) and 'A Global Clan: Scottish Migrant Networks and Identities Since the Eighteenth Century' (2006).