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TITLE
Aultnaslanach Viaduct
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_05_052_0458
PLACENAME
Moy
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Moy and Dalarossie
DATE OF IMAGE
18 June 1980
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
The Highland Council Planning Department
ASSET ID
15092
KEYWORDS
bridges
viaducts
railways
trains
transport
Aultnaslanach Viaduct

Aultnaslanach Viaduct crossed Allt na Slanaich, a tributary of the Moy Burn, on the main railway line between Perth and Inverness. It is the only remaining wooden viaduct on the rail network in Scotland. The viaduct was designed by Murdoch Paterson, the Chief Engineer to the Highland Railway, and was completed in 1897. Due to the nature of the boggy ground the structure was wooden in keep the weight down and because suitable foundations for masonry piers couldn't be created. The viaduct is a grade A listed structure. This meant that when rot was discovered in the timbers, repair work had to be undertaken sensitively. A concrete structure was inserted within the existing structure to take the weight of the railway while leaving the original timber structure intact.

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Aultnaslanach Viaduct

INVERNESS: Moy and Dalarossie

1980s

bridges; viaducts; railways; trains; transport

The Highland Council Planning Department

The Highland Council Planning Dept

Aultnaslanach Viaduct crossed Allt na Slanaich, a tributary of the Moy Burn, on the main railway line between Perth and Inverness. It is the only remaining wooden viaduct on the rail network in Scotland. The viaduct was designed by Murdoch Paterson, the Chief Engineer to the Highland Railway, and was completed in 1897. Due to the nature of the boggy ground the structure was wooden in keep the weight down and because suitable foundations for masonry piers couldn't be created. The viaduct is a grade A listed structure. This meant that when rot was discovered in the timbers, repair work had to be undertaken sensitively. A concrete structure was inserted within the existing structure to take the weight of the railway while leaving the original timber structure intact.