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TITLE
What would you put in your emigrant's kist? - Douglas Gibson
EXTERNAL ID
AB_SGI_09_DOUGLAS_GIBSON_Q_06
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Douglas Gibson
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1512
KEYWORDS
conferences
emigration
lecturers
audio
audios
emigrantkist

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As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad.

Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Douglas Gibson answers the question:

'If you were emigrating today and your luggage restriction was a typical emigrant's kist what would you put in it?' (A typical kist would be approx. 96cm x 51cm x 56cm.)

'As for the luggage restriction - it's very hard to say. The trick, I think, is to put in the emigrant's kist, which is not very capacious, those personal things that can't be reproduced. And by that I'm suggesting, I suppose, old family photographs and that sort of thing. In other words, you can always now, in the modern world, buy another copy of a book, you can always get another electronic device, but what you can't replicate is something that was hand-made at home, knitted, or something that has tremendous personal significance like the family photographs. So, I'd fill up my kist with the, the personal family stuff. And interestingly, a parallel there is the sort of instruction that people in British Columbia, when fire struck the Okanagan Valley, they were given advice about what sort of stuff they should take with them if fire was threatening their house. And so they did go through this sort of selecting process. So that, as happened to my brother in law, his family got an hour's notice and were told, 'Listen, the fire's coming. You'd better leave.' And they lost the house, but they did take the family photos and so on with them.'


BIOGRAPHY

Douglas Gibson, born and educated in Scotland, is a graduate of St. Andrews and Yale. He has spent over forty years as an editor and publisher in Canada, working with many of that country's finest writers.

© Photo by Lois Siegel

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What would you put in your emigrant's kist? - Douglas Gibson

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

conferences; emigration; lecturers; audio; audios; emigrantkist;

Am Baile

Scotland's Global Impact

As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad. <br /> <br /> Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Douglas Gibson answers the question:<br /> <br /> 'If you were emigrating today and your luggage restriction was a typical emigrant's kist what would you put in it?' (A typical kist would be approx. 96cm x 51cm x 56cm.)<br /> <br /> 'As for the luggage restriction - it's very hard to say. The trick, I think, is to put in the emigrant's kist, which is not very capacious, those personal things that can't be reproduced. And by that I'm suggesting, I suppose, old family photographs and that sort of thing. In other words, you can always now, in the modern world, buy another copy of a book, you can always get another electronic device, but what you can't replicate is something that was hand-made at home, knitted, or something that has tremendous personal significance like the family photographs. So, I'd fill up my kist with the, the personal family stuff. And interestingly, a parallel there is the sort of instruction that people in British Columbia, when fire struck the Okanagan Valley, they were given advice about what sort of stuff they should take with them if fire was threatening their house. And so they did go through this sort of selecting process. So that, as happened to my brother in law, his family got an hour's notice and were told, 'Listen, the fire's coming. You'd better leave.' And they lost the house, but they did take the family photos and so on with them.'<br /> <br /> <br /> BIOGRAPHY<br /> <br /> Douglas Gibson, born and educated in Scotland, is a graduate of St. Andrews and Yale. He has spent over forty years as an editor and publisher in Canada, working with many of that country's finest writers.<br /> <br /> © Photo by Lois Siegel