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TITLE
What did you speak about at Scotland's Global Impact? - Philomena de Lima
EXTERNAL ID
AB_SGI_10_PHILOMENA_DE_LIMA_Q_03
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Philomena de Lima
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
1515
KEYWORDS
conferences
emigration
lecturers
audio
audios
speakabout

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As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad.

Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Philomena de Lima answers the question:

'Could you give a brief summary of what you spoke about at the conference?'

'Well, basically I'm going to be speaking about the experiences of what I called new immigrants, but you know, ethnic minorities - ok, that's a word we use here - and those are people who've come - they might be first generation or they might be second or third generation - people whose origins are in the British ex-colonies of say, Asia and Africa and so on. But more recently also I've done some studies looking at the east Europeans and the central, and the central Europeans. And so I'm interested in the way in which, if you like, the narrative of the Scottish and the Highlands as welcoming plays out in the context of people's real experiences, and counterpoising that narrative, if you like, about Scotland, you know, and how Scottish people are always seen as the welcoming people.'


BIOGRAPHY

Dr Philomena de Lima is the Director of the UHI Centre for Remote and Rural Studies based in Inverness. She has lived in the Highlands for around 25 years. She has been actively involved in researching rural policy issues, particularly with regard to migration, social exclusion, minorities and equalities and has published widely on these topics. Recent publications include, with Wright (2009) 'Welcoming Migrants? Migrant labour in rural Scotland in Social Policy and Society', issue 8:3; 'Ticking the Ethnic Box: the experiences of minority ethnic young people in rural communities' in Education in the North, New Series , Number 15 Session 2007-2008, University of Aberdeen; with Jentsch and MacDonald, 'Migrant Workers in Rural Scotland: Going to the Middle of Nowhere' in International Journal on Multicultural Societies (IJMS), Vol. 9, No. 1, 2007; and with Williams, 'Devolution, Multicultural Citizenship and Race Equality: from Laissez Faire to Nationally Responsible Policies' in Critical Social Policy, Vol. 26 (3) 2006.

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What did you speak about at Scotland's Global Impact? - Philomena de Lima

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

2000s

conferences; emigration; lecturers; audio; audios; speakabout;

Am Baile

Scotland's Global Impact

As part of Homecoming Scotland 2009, a three-day international conference - Scotland's Global Impact - was held at Eden Court theatre, Inverness from 22-24 October. Prominent academics, historians and other experts came together to provoke healthy discussion on the history of migration and the influence of Scots abroad. <br /> <br /> Am Baile interviewed several of the speakers during the conference. In this audio extract, Dr Philomena de Lima answers the question:<br /> <br /> 'Could you give a brief summary of what you spoke about at the conference?' <br /> <br /> 'Well, basically I'm going to be speaking about the experiences of what I called new immigrants, but you know, ethnic minorities - ok, that's a word we use here - and those are people who've come - they might be first generation or they might be second or third generation - people whose origins are in the British ex-colonies of say, Asia and Africa and so on. But more recently also I've done some studies looking at the east Europeans and the central, and the central Europeans. And so I'm interested in the way in which, if you like, the narrative of the Scottish and the Highlands as welcoming plays out in the context of people's real experiences, and counterpoising that narrative, if you like, about Scotland, you know, and how Scottish people are always seen as the welcoming people.'<br /> <br /> <br /> BIOGRAPHY<br /> <br /> Dr Philomena de Lima is the Director of the UHI Centre for Remote and Rural Studies based in Inverness. She has lived in the Highlands for around 25 years. She has been actively involved in researching rural policy issues, particularly with regard to migration, social exclusion, minorities and equalities and has published widely on these topics. Recent publications include, with Wright (2009) 'Welcoming Migrants? Migrant labour in rural Scotland in Social Policy and Society', issue 8:3; 'Ticking the Ethnic Box: the experiences of minority ethnic young people in rural communities' in Education in the North, New Series , Number 15 Session 2007-2008, University of Aberdeen; with Jentsch and MacDonald, 'Migrant Workers in Rural Scotland: Going to the Middle of Nowhere' in International Journal on Multicultural Societies (IJMS), Vol. 9, No. 1, 2007; and with Williams, 'Devolution, Multicultural Citizenship and Race Equality: from Laissez Faire to Nationally Responsible Policies' in Critical Social Policy, Vol. 26 (3) 2006.