Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Black Isle Heritage Memories - Hermione Protheroe (7 of 11)
EXTERNAL ID
ARCH_HERMI_PROTHEROE_02_05
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF RECORDING
2010
PERIOD
2010s
CREATOR
Hermi Protheroe
SOURCE
ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)
ASSET ID
1519
KEYWORDS
audios
built environment
villages
dwellings
houses
Second World War
cloutie wells
clootie wells

Get Adobe Flash player

In this audio extract Avoch resident, Hermione Protheroe, talks about the local clootie well, a feature called the 'Giant's Staff', and the presence of Polish and Norwegian soldiers during World War II.

The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.

Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)

HP: And on the first Sunday in May, oh gangs of us would go along Henrietta, the end of Henrietta there was a road going up there, and we carried on for a few miles, branched to the left and we went to Craigach. Now Craigach was the wishing well and everybody went there and wished for a bike or whatever, that you passed your exams and you tied your cloot on the thing and then ...

CM: It was a clootie well?

HP: Clootie well, not like the one in Munlochy, no.

CM: Not the one in Munlochy, no.

HP: I think, since that, probably cows have eaten it. But I don't know what - I think people still go.

CM: Like that. So Hermy you were telling me you would walk along Henrietta Street ...

HP: Yes, up to the Den, up to the Den and then we didn't go to Castletown, we went on to the next fork, which was one road going to the Drum and the other one going to Benetsfield and we'd go along there and cross over the fence, down the fields and we would come to the bay and there, there was Craigach wishing well where we hung out cloots and wished for whatever we wanted. And, eh, all the way up of course we'd be looking for birds' nests - it was a great thing - there were lots of hedges along there and sometimes we would take a picnic. And it was a very peaceful little bay that, because I know, not so long ago, someone had, a young chap - I mean he was old when he died - but when he was young, had many happy days there so he had his ashes scattered there, but it was a lovely peaceful place and I do believe that people still go there. And then of course, across the road from Benetsfield, between the Drum and Benetsfield, we would look up and see this Giant's Staff and I honestly don't know, I don't think we ever went up to it to see what it was.

CM: And it was a big mast, or?

HP: It was like a big, eh, pillar. A big pillar. [?]

CM: One of the things we've been talking about over the last few weeks, Hermy, is that, em, during the war, Avoch was a place that welcomed many of the servicemen and there was a camp in Avoch. Do you, can you tell me where that was in the village and what's there now?

HP: Yes, as we say, in those days there was eh, we called it the Laney, down the Laney, that's where they built sheltered houses, either side, where the tennis courts are, where the park was - they were all built there - and I think there were Scots, English soldiers and there were Polish, and I think there were Norwegian because, em, my sisters of course had a great time. They were all older and they all had boyfriends and actually, the shoemakers in the camp used to come to my father if they wanted anything and Father used to say 'Go ben and see the girls'. So one of my sisters had a long time Polish friend and, eh, I do remember the buildings, you know, and I do remember, of course being on the High Street, I think, being the Sunday, the Polish army would be marching past the house, and I could sing the song that [?] you've got the Polish voice and I'm [?] Inverness I speak. D'you know and they laughed.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Black Isle Heritage Memories - Hermione Protheroe (7 of 11)

ROSS

2010s

audios; built environment; villages; dwellings; houses; Second World War; cloutie wells; clootie wells;

ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands)

ARCH: Black Isle Heritage Memories

In this audio extract Avoch resident, Hermione Protheroe, talks about the local clootie well, a feature called the 'Giant's Staff', and the presence of Polish and Norwegian soldiers during World War II.<br /> <br /> The audio recording was carried out as part of the Black Isle Heritage Memories Project, undertaken in 2009/2010 by ARCH (Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands). To find out more about the project, follow the link towards the foot of the page.<br /> <br /> Transcription: (Interviewer: Cait McCullagh)<br /> <br /> HP: And on the first Sunday in May, oh gangs of us would go along Henrietta, the end of Henrietta there was a road going up there, and we carried on for a few miles, branched to the left and we went to Craigach. Now Craigach was the wishing well and everybody went there and wished for a bike or whatever, that you passed your exams and you tied your cloot on the thing and then ...<br /> <br /> CM: It was a clootie well?<br /> <br /> HP: Clootie well, not like the one in Munlochy, no.<br /> <br /> CM: Not the one in Munlochy, no.<br /> <br /> HP: I think, since that, probably cows have eaten it. But I don't know what - I think people still go.<br /> <br /> CM: Like that. So Hermy you were telling me you would walk along Henrietta Street ...<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, up to the Den, up to the Den and then we didn't go to Castletown, we went on to the next fork, which was one road going to the Drum and the other one going to Benetsfield and we'd go along there and cross over the fence, down the fields and we would come to the bay and there, there was Craigach wishing well where we hung out cloots and wished for whatever we wanted. And, eh, all the way up of course we'd be looking for birds' nests - it was a great thing - there were lots of hedges along there and sometimes we would take a picnic. And it was a very peaceful little bay that, because I know, not so long ago, someone had, a young chap - I mean he was old when he died - but when he was young, had many happy days there so he had his ashes scattered there, but it was a lovely peaceful place and I do believe that people still go there. And then of course, across the road from Benetsfield, between the Drum and Benetsfield, we would look up and see this Giant's Staff and I honestly don't know, I don't think we ever went up to it to see what it was.<br /> <br /> CM: And it was a big mast, or?<br /> <br /> HP: It was like a big, eh, pillar. A big pillar. [?]<br /> <br /> CM: One of the things we've been talking about over the last few weeks, Hermy, is that, em, during the war, Avoch was a place that welcomed many of the servicemen and there was a camp in Avoch. Do you, can you tell me where that was in the village and what's there now?<br /> <br /> HP: Yes, as we say, in those days there was eh, we called it the Laney, down the Laney, that's where they built sheltered houses, either side, where the tennis courts are, where the park was - they were all built there - and I think there were Scots, English soldiers and there were Polish, and I think there were Norwegian because, em, my sisters of course had a great time. They were all older and they all had boyfriends and actually, the shoemakers in the camp used to come to my father if they wanted anything and Father used to say 'Go ben and see the girls'. So one of my sisters had a long time Polish friend and, eh, I do remember the buildings, you know, and I do remember, of course being on the High Street, I think, being the Sunday, the Polish army would be marching past the house, and I could sing the song that [?] you've got the Polish voice and I'm [?] Inverness I speak. D'you know and they laughed.