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TITLE
Dornoch Memories of World War 2 (2 of 6)
EXTERNAL ID
DNHHL_TPYF_02
PLACENAME
Dornoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Dornoch
DATE OF RECORDING
November 2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Lorna Currie, Dr J Grant, R Glen Grant and W E Skinner
SOURCE
Historylinks Museum, Dornoch
ASSET ID
1524
KEYWORDS
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
interviews
war memories
Christmas parties
Christmas trees
birthday parties
audio

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This interview was recorded by Dornoch Historylinks Museum in November 2005. As part of a 'Their Past Your Future' programme, pupils from Dornoch Primary School interviewed local residents about their memories of World War 2. In this extract Lorna Currie, Dr J Grant, R Glen Grant and W E Skinner recall how birthdays and Christmas were celebrated in Sutherland during World War 2.

Pupil: How did you celebrate birthdays and Christmas during the war?

Well, Christmas for a start, up here, wasn't really celebrated until after the fifties. In fact, the first Christmas Day I got off work was in 1960 and then it was only fathers with children that got the day off. That's what we did but if anybody had children they were allowed off for Christmas Day. But that didn't start until 1960, so we never really looked on Christmas Day. New Year was the great time; you got two days off at the New Year. And birthdays were not a great celebration. It was- You were wished a happy birthday by your mother and sent off to school. End of story.

Well, Christmas, you just, there still was the presents, or Santa Claus, whatever. Presents were there but there was no great big Christmas dinner or anything. The big dining experience was the roast on the, on New Year's Day. It was the day that we celebrated.

That was the big day.

We had a lovely Christmas party here though, at school.

Oh, you always did that.

The Duke of Sutherland gave us a party, I think, and provided a magnificent tree. It was a lovely tree always.

I remember going to a Christmas party in the Royal Golf Hotel. It was, at that time it was taken over by the RAF, and they had a Christmas party for all the local children and I was one of them and I remember being there. I don't know if you'd've been there, would you? Do you remember that?

Yes, I do remember that.

Yes. And that was quite an experience for us. And I remember we got a goodie bag back with us and I think it was a few little cakes that we got and I think that was it.

And lots of fun. It was upstairs, wasn't it?

It was upstairs. We went up the stairs in the Royal Golf.

In the Royal Golf Hotel.

They had some quite accomplished musicians amongst the RAF at that time, so they had quite a nice little orchestra to play.

But for birthdays, we just had a little party at home, with just one or two friends. We didn't have big parties in those days.

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Dornoch Memories of World War 2 (2 of 6)

SUTHERLAND: Dornoch

2000s

World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; interviews; war memories; Christmas parties; Christmas trees; birthday parties; audio

Historylinks Museum, Dornoch

Voices From Their Past - Dornoch

This interview was recorded by Dornoch Historylinks Museum in November 2005. As part of a 'Their Past Your Future' programme, pupils from Dornoch Primary School interviewed local residents about their memories of World War 2. In this extract Lorna Currie, Dr J Grant, R Glen Grant and W E Skinner recall how birthdays and Christmas were celebrated in Sutherland during World War 2.<br /> <br /> Pupil: How did you celebrate birthdays and Christmas during the war?<br /> <br /> Well, Christmas for a start, up here, wasn't really celebrated until after the fifties. In fact, the first Christmas Day I got off work was in 1960 and then it was only fathers with children that got the day off. That's what we did but if anybody had children they were allowed off for Christmas Day. But that didn't start until 1960, so we never really looked on Christmas Day. New Year was the great time; you got two days off at the New Year. And birthdays were not a great celebration. It was- You were wished a happy birthday by your mother and sent off to school. End of story.<br /> <br /> Well, Christmas, you just, there still was the presents, or Santa Claus, whatever. Presents were there but there was no great big Christmas dinner or anything. The big dining experience was the roast on the, on New Year's Day. It was the day that we celebrated.<br /> <br /> That was the big day.<br /> <br /> We had a lovely Christmas party here though, at school. <br /> <br /> Oh, you always did that. <br /> <br /> The Duke of Sutherland gave us a party, I think, and provided a magnificent tree. It was a lovely tree always. <br /> <br /> I remember going to a Christmas party in the Royal Golf Hotel. It was, at that time it was taken over by the RAF, and they had a Christmas party for all the local children and I was one of them and I remember being there. I don't know if you'd've been there, would you? Do you remember that?<br /> <br /> Yes, I do remember that.<br /> <br /> Yes. And that was quite an experience for us. And I remember we got a goodie bag back with us and I think it was a few little cakes that we got and I think that was it. <br /> <br /> And lots of fun. It was upstairs, wasn't it?<br /> <br /> It was upstairs. We went up the stairs in the Royal Golf. <br /> <br /> In the Royal Golf Hotel.<br /> <br /> They had some quite accomplished musicians amongst the RAF at that time, so they had quite a nice little orchestra to play.<br /> <br /> But for birthdays, we just had a little party at home, with just one or two friends. We didn't have big parties in those days.