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TITLE
Lord Lovat talks about his father's employees overseas
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFRLORDLOVAT_06
PLACENAME
Beauly
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmorack
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Simon Fraser, 17th Lord Lovat
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1540
KEYWORDS
Commandos
Commandoes
armed forces
Second World War
agriculture
laird
lairds
colonialism
audio

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Simon Fraser, commonly known as the 17th Lord Lovat, (1911-1995), was the 25th Chief of the Clan Fraser and a prominent British Commando during World War II. He was seriously wounded during the invasion of Normandy in 1944 but went on to make a full recovery. In the post-war period he devoted much of his time to politics and looking after the family estates in the Beauly district.

In this audio extract, taken from an interview with Sam Marshall for Moray Firth Radio, Lord Lovat recalls how his father employed local men to work on his cotton and coffee plantations abroad.

'My father always gave jobs to farmers' sons who showed promise in their ability and keenness to go overseas. He had them in the Sudan as well, the MacGillivray family, they had a great success in the Sudan plantations. There were three Frasers at the time as I was working in Brazil who were sons of local men in the Beauly district. One of them became a very rich man. Another one, Ian Fraser, Balachraggan, died young'

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Lord Lovat talks about his father's employees overseas

INVERNESS: Kilmorack

1980s

Commandos; Commandoes; armed forces; Second World War; agriculture; laird; lairds; colonialism; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Lord Lovat

Simon Fraser, commonly known as the 17th Lord Lovat, (1911-1995), was the 25th Chief of the Clan Fraser and a prominent British Commando during World War II. He was seriously wounded during the invasion of Normandy in 1944 but went on to make a full recovery. In the post-war period he devoted much of his time to politics and looking after the family estates in the Beauly district. <br /> <br /> In this audio extract, taken from an interview with Sam Marshall for Moray Firth Radio, Lord Lovat recalls how his father employed local men to work on his cotton and coffee plantations abroad.<br /> <br /> 'My father always gave jobs to farmers' sons who showed promise in their ability and keenness to go overseas. He had them in the Sudan as well, the MacGillivray family, they had a great success in the Sudan plantations. There were three Frasers at the time as I was working in Brazil who were sons of local men in the Beauly district. One of them became a very rich man. Another one, Ian Fraser, Balachraggan, died young'