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TITLE
Lord Lovat talks about hill farming
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFRLORDLOVAT_15
PLACENAME
Beauly
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmorack
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Simon Fraser, 17th Lord Lovat
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1551
KEYWORDS
Commandos
Commandoes
armed forces
Second World War
agriculture
laird
lairds
farming
cattle
estates
audio

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Simon Fraser, commonly known as the 17th Lord Lovat, (1911-1995), was the 25th Chief of the Clan Fraser and a prominent British Commando during World War II. He was seriously wounded during the invasion of Normandy in 1944 but went on to make a full recovery. In the post-war period he devoted much of his time to politics and looking after the family estates in the Beauly district.

In this audio extract, taken from an interview with Sam Marshall for Moray Firth Radio, Lord Lovat recalls his life as a hill farmer in the post-war years.

'Well, I'd been away for quite a while and really had to pull things together on the home front and I was tremendously interested in cattle breeding and hill farming. And having a big estate, being fortunate enough to have inherited a large estate, I rather cut down on the sporting assets and concentrated, not on grouse and deer, but on hill cattle and sheep. And I also had quite a good herd of beef shorthorns, which have now sadly gone out of fashion, and Aberdeen Angus, so I had quite a lot of farming interests. And I was farming at one time the whole of Glenstrathfarrar, which is 30,000 acres, and had six hirsels of sheep and about 1,000 hill cows as well as the pedig- and their followers, as well the pedigree herd, so I was a full-time farmer.

Hill farming needs two things; you have to have high ground and low ground; it's rather like ranching in the New World where in fact I picked up a lot of what I know, and I was lucky to have good land round Beaufort, Beauly, where you could prepare to make the silage, or the hay, or the straw, which you fed the cattle on who had plenty to eat all summer, but there came a moment when they needed another form of sustenance - and there's no grass in the winter. And also I had big woods which they could find shelter in where they kept as dry and warm as if they'd been in the house, so I had the whole Beauly valley to run cattle up and down on'

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Lord Lovat talks about hill farming

INVERNESS: Kilmorack

1980s

Commandos; Commandoes; armed forces; Second World War; agriculture; laird; lairds; farming; cattle; estates; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Lord Lovat

Simon Fraser, commonly known as the 17th Lord Lovat, (1911-1995), was the 25th Chief of the Clan Fraser and a prominent British Commando during World War II. He was seriously wounded during the invasion of Normandy in 1944 but went on to make a full recovery. In the post-war period he devoted much of his time to politics and looking after the family estates in the Beauly district. <br /> <br /> In this audio extract, taken from an interview with Sam Marshall for Moray Firth Radio, Lord Lovat recalls his life as a hill farmer in the post-war years.<br /> <br /> 'Well, I'd been away for quite a while and really had to pull things together on the home front and I was tremendously interested in cattle breeding and hill farming. And having a big estate, being fortunate enough to have inherited a large estate, I rather cut down on the sporting assets and concentrated, not on grouse and deer, but on hill cattle and sheep. And I also had quite a good herd of beef shorthorns, which have now sadly gone out of fashion, and Aberdeen Angus, so I had quite a lot of farming interests. And I was farming at one time the whole of Glenstrathfarrar, which is 30,000 acres, and had six hirsels of sheep and about 1,000 hill cows as well as the pedig- and their followers, as well the pedigree herd, so I was a full-time farmer. <br /> <br /> Hill farming needs two things; you have to have high ground and low ground; it's rather like ranching in the New World where in fact I picked up a lot of what I know, and I was lucky to have good land round Beaufort, Beauly, where you could prepare to make the silage, or the hay, or the straw, which you fed the cattle on who had plenty to eat all summer, but there came a moment when they needed another form of sustenance - and there's no grass in the winter. And also I had big woods which they could find shelter in where they kept as dry and warm as if they'd been in the house, so I had the whole Beauly valley to run cattle up and down on'