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TITLE
Aonghas Grant, the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ANGUSGRANT_01
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Aonghas Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1559
KEYWORDS
Angus Grant
fiddlers
traditional music
audio

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Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about being a left-handed fiddle player.

Interviewer: Not many left-handed fiddlers around, are there?

No, they're something like the golden eagle; a wee bit scarce on the ground.

Interviewer: Aye?

There's a few - I've one or two pupils that's left handed.

Interviewer: I noticed when you came into the studio you signed in, so you're obviously left handed naturally?

Oh aye, left handed. So was my father and four of his brothers. And my grandfather. So it seems to be in the genes.

Interviewer: Tell me, is your fiddle different from any other fiddle? Is it strung in a different way or strung the opposite way round?

Aye. It's - the strings are opposite way round; the 'e's on the left side and the 'g's on the right side, and then the base bar is on the right side and the sound post is on the left side, and your bridge is the opposite way round. Your pegs are - your 'a' peg is on the left side at the top. It's quite different. It's not just a case of shifting the strings; you've to shift the whole interior of it as well

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Aonghas Grant, the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber

1990s

Angus Grant; fiddlers; traditional music; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Angus Grant

Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about being a left-handed fiddle player.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Not many left-handed fiddlers around, are there?<br /> <br /> No, they're something like the golden eagle; a wee bit scarce on the ground. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Aye?<br /> <br /> There's a few - I've one or two pupils that's left handed.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I noticed when you came into the studio you signed in, so you're obviously left handed naturally? <br /> <br /> Oh aye, left handed. So was my father and four of his brothers. And my grandfather. So it seems to be in the genes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Tell me, is your fiddle different from any other fiddle? Is it strung in a different way or strung the opposite way round?<br /> <br /> Aye. It's - the strings are opposite way round; the 'e's on the left side and the 'g's on the right side, and then the base bar is on the right side and the sound post is on the left side, and your bridge is the opposite way round. Your pegs are - your 'a' peg is on the left side at the top. It's quite different. It's not just a case of shifting the strings; you've to shift the whole interior of it as well