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TITLE
Angus Grant, the shepherd
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ANGUSGRANT_04
PLACENAME
Fort Augustus
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Aonghas Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1564
KEYWORDS
Angus Grant
fiddlers
traditional music
deerstalking
sheep
audio

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Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about his life as a shepherd.

Interviewer: Now you mentioned Fort Augustus. Does that mean you were born around that area?

Oh aye, I belonged to that parts, aye. We're actually Grants and Morrison - on my father's side of the family.

Interviewer: And what did your father - what did your family - what did your father do?

Well, they were all, on my father's side of the family, they were all shepherds, deerstalkers, which I did myself once I left school. I followed that line.

Interviewer: What estate would that have been there, then?

That was in Calachy Estate in Fort Augustus with Mrs Becket. I worked for about a year on Glendoe Estate, on the farm, doing general everything; feeding tups and cattle and horses and - My interest was the sheep and the dogs.

Interviewer: You'd more interest in the sheep than anything else, had you, at that time?

Aye. And sheepdogs and -

Interviewer: Did you go to the sheepdog trials?

No, I never went and always, and although I say it myself, I'd always good dogs, and always was lucky with dogs and - even from pups I always got them working well. And I sometimes look back and I think it's something like teaching the young fiddlers. I seem to get on well with them too and produce good fiddlers. Used to produce good sheepdogs

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Angus Grant, the shepherd

INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff

1990s

Angus Grant; fiddlers; traditional music; deerstalking; sheep; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Angus Grant

Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about his life as a shepherd.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now you mentioned Fort Augustus. Does that mean you were born around that area?<br /> <br /> Oh aye, I belonged to that parts, aye. We're actually Grants and Morrison - on my father's side of the family.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And what did your father - what did your family - what did your father do?<br /> <br /> Well, they were all, on my father's side of the family, they were all shepherds, deerstalkers, which I did myself once I left school. I followed that line. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: What estate would that have been there, then?<br /> <br /> That was in Calachy Estate in Fort Augustus with Mrs Becket. I worked for about a year on Glendoe Estate, on the farm, doing general everything; feeding tups and cattle and horses and - My interest was the sheep and the dogs.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You'd more interest in the sheep than anything else, had you, at that time?<br /> <br /> Aye. And sheepdogs and -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you go to the sheepdog trials?<br /> <br /> No, I never went and always, and although I say it myself, I'd always good dogs, and always was lucky with dogs and - even from pups I always got them working well. And I sometimes look back and I think it's something like teaching the young fiddlers. I seem to get on well with them too and produce good fiddlers. Used to produce good sheepdogs