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TITLE
Angus Grant on Bobby Macleod
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ANGUSGRANT_05
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Aonghas Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1565
KEYWORDS
Angus Grant
fiddlers
traditional music
accordions
Jimmy Shand
audio

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Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about Bobby Macleod (1925-1991), the accordion maestro from Mull.

Interviewer: When did you first meet Bobby?

Och, about forty years ago - forty odd years ago. I was saying although Shand was the hero of the Lowlanders, Bobby was the hero of the Highlanders. He was our hero. And the great style he had of playing the pipe marches, cause he played the pipes himself, and he'd a real knowledge of the phrasing of the pipe marches, and the accordion, and also on the Gaelic Airs. He'd a lovely style of playing the Gaelic Airs and he was also a great accompanist for a singer, singing Gaelic songs. And over the years, Farquhar [Macrae] and myself, every Spring we used to put a - there used to be a great ceilidh on in the old hotel at Lochearnhead for Ewen Cameron. He used to put this big ceilidh on for the - raise money for the games, Lochearnhead Games. And Bobby and Farquhar and myself were usually invited down to that. And on the Sunday there was always a great session went on in the bar. Playing all sort of tunes, before we went home and we'd have a wonderful session there with Bobby.

Interviewer: Did you learn a lot from Bobby, d'you think?

Oh yes. His style and his phrasing is - It was very like our own style, you know, but picked up a lot of tips from him. He's a wonderful style of playing pipe marches

Interviewer: Did you ever play with him as a band?

Not actually a band. I played a lot with him back and fore; I was in Mull for a couple of years with the Forestry Commission and - after I got married I went with the Forestry Commission - and at the weekends, if Bobby was at home at Mishnish, we'd go up there and we'd have a session in there and played with him on one or two occasions at festivals and that. The last time was in Lochaber at the Corran Hotel at Corran, down at the ferry. We played there and the place was mobbed just - Bobby, it was about the last time I think he played anywhere around Lochaber

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Angus Grant on Bobby Macleod

1990s

Angus Grant; fiddlers; traditional music; accordions; Jimmy Shand; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Angus Grant

Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about Bobby Macleod (1925-1991), the accordion maestro from Mull.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: When did you first meet Bobby?<br /> <br /> Och, about forty years ago - forty odd years ago. I was saying although Shand was the hero of the Lowlanders, Bobby was the hero of the Highlanders. He was our hero. And the great style he had of playing the pipe marches, cause he played the pipes himself, and he'd a real knowledge of the phrasing of the pipe marches, and the accordion, and also on the Gaelic Airs. He'd a lovely style of playing the Gaelic Airs and he was also a great accompanist for a singer, singing Gaelic songs. And over the years, Farquhar [Macrae] and myself, every Spring we used to put a - there used to be a great ceilidh on in the old hotel at Lochearnhead for Ewen Cameron. He used to put this big ceilidh on for the - raise money for the games, Lochearnhead Games. And Bobby and Farquhar and myself were usually invited down to that. And on the Sunday there was always a great session went on in the bar. Playing all sort of tunes, before we went home and we'd have a wonderful session there with Bobby.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you learn a lot from Bobby, d'you think?<br /> <br /> Oh yes. His style and his phrasing is - It was very like our own style, you know, but picked up a lot of tips from him. He's a wonderful style of playing pipe marches<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you ever play with him as a band?<br /> <br /> Not actually a band. I played a lot with him back and fore; I was in Mull for a couple of years with the Forestry Commission and - after I got married I went with the Forestry Commission - and at the weekends, if Bobby was at home at Mishnish, we'd go up there and we'd have a session in there and played with him on one or two occasions at festivals and that. The last time was in Lochaber at the Corran Hotel at Corran, down at the ferry. We played there and the place was mobbed just - Bobby, it was about the last time I think he played anywhere around Lochaber