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TITLE
Angus Grant at Stirling University (3 of 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ANGUSGRANT_11
PLACENAME
Stirling
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Aonghas Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1574
KEYWORDS
Angus Grant
fiddlers
traditional music
audio

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Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about the traditional music summer courses at Stirling University.

Interviewer: Now you said you've been over to Alastair Fraser's school in -

California.

Interviewer: California?

Twice out there

Interviewer: Aye. How big is that?

Oh that's a big one. That's about nearly a hundred fiddlers coming from all over the place and they finish off with a - put on a big concert in Santa Cruz, and it's usually a huge concert and -

Interviewer: How many pupils do you have in a class at any time then, say, at Stirling or over there?

Interviewer: Well, at Stirling when it was at the peak you'd have twenty-five to thirty -

Interviewer: At one time?

- a piece, aye. It was a pretty big class; it was actually too big.

Interviewer: I was away to say, I mean, what's the sort of ideal size for something like that then?

Och, I would say, I would say a dozen, a dozen. It's back down to that now. There's not the big crowds coming now with Alastair taking most of the Americans away, going to his class. It's gone down a lot.

Interviewer: What about the Scots fiddlers? Are you getting a lot of good, good, Scots local, home-grown fiddlers?

Oh, aye there's quite a few of them come. There's one young lad he comes from Tuscany - an Italian. A chap called Fabrizio Pilou. You wouldn't - if you were behind a screen - you wouldn't know that he wasn't a Scottish fiddler. He's got a great feel, particularly for the Highland music and he used to always go between Tom Anderson's class and myself.

Interviewer: And how old a lad would he be now?

Oh I'm sure he's in his thirties now.

Interviewer: I see. Aye, aye. And he comes - Has he been coming every year?

No, just odd times.

Interviewer: Odd times.

But, in between times he keeps it going and that.

Interviewer: The interest is there

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Angus Grant at Stirling University (3 of 3)

1990s

Angus Grant; fiddlers; traditional music; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Angus Grant

Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about the traditional music summer courses at Stirling University.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Now you said you've been over to Alastair Fraser's school in -<br /> <br /> California.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: California?<br /> <br /> Twice out there<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Aye. How big is that?<br /> <br /> Oh that's a big one. That's about nearly a hundred fiddlers coming from all over the place and they finish off with a - put on a big concert in Santa Cruz, and it's usually a huge concert and - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: How many pupils do you have in a class at any time then, say, at Stirling or over there?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Well, at Stirling when it was at the peak you'd have twenty-five to thirty -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: At one time?<br /> <br /> - a piece, aye. It was a pretty big class; it was actually too big.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I was away to say, I mean, what's the sort of ideal size for something like that then?<br /> <br /> Och, I would say, I would say a dozen, a dozen. It's back down to that now. There's not the big crowds coming now with Alastair taking most of the Americans away, going to his class. It's gone down a lot.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What about the Scots fiddlers? Are you getting a lot of good, good, Scots local, home-grown fiddlers?<br /> <br /> Oh, aye there's quite a few of them come. There's one young lad he comes from Tuscany - an Italian. A chap called Fabrizio Pilou. You wouldn't - if you were behind a screen - you wouldn't know that he wasn't a Scottish fiddler. He's got a great feel, particularly for the Highland music and he used to always go between Tom Anderson's class and myself.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And how old a lad would he be now?<br /> <br /> Oh I'm sure he's in his thirties now.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I see. Aye, aye. And he comes - Has he been coming every year?<br /> <br /> No, just odd times.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Odd times. <br /> <br /> But, in between times he keeps it going and that.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The interest is there