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TITLE
Angus Grant on MacAndrew and Borland
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ANGUSGRANT_12
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Aonghas Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1575
KEYWORDS
Angus Grant
fiddlers
traditional music
audio

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Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about the great Scottish fiddle player, Hector MacAndrew (1903-1980), and one of his pupils - Gregor Borland.



Interviewer: Hector MacAndrew. Did you ever meet Hector?



I only met Hector once, here in Inverness; he was a guest down, of the Strathspey and Reel Society, and I'd admired his playing for years, hearing his records and - He stood out. He was a one-off. I mean, he stood head and shoulders above all the other fiddlers in his style. He had a style that was Hector MacAndrew; he wasn't sort of copying anybody or that and -



Interviewer: What made it stand - made him stand out then Angus, do you think?



Well, I don't know. Was it the easy style he had of playing and making everything stand out on the bowing and the phrasing, the wonderful phrasing, particularly playing that east coast style that we don't have - the slow Strathspeys - and his airs? And of course he'd a beautiful violin - I think it was a Pietro Guarneri - Italian violin that he had. But the only time I met him, we were invited back to his niece's house for a session and he made everything, the most difficult tune, look so simple. And he left, he left a lot of good pupils behind him - Douglas Lawrence.



Interviewer: Yes, and Gregor Borland.



Gregor Borland. I heard Gregor playing recently. I was down back in the summer adjudicating at the Auchtermuchty Festival and on the Sunday night Gregor was playing there and he played an air and he'd all Hector's style of bowing it, you know? I could see right away that was Hector's touch there. So Hector's gone but he's left something behind.



Interviewer: And I suppose - Obviously you saw him on television too, did you?



Aye, thon time that - when he was talking to Yehudi Menuhin.



Interviewer: Yehudi Menuhin, yes.



Aye, that was a great programme.



Interviewer: Yes

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Angus Grant on MacAndrew and Borland

1990s

Angus Grant; fiddlers; traditional music; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Angus Grant

Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about the great Scottish fiddle player, Hector MacAndrew (1903-1980), and one of his pupils - Gregor Borland.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Interviewer: Hector MacAndrew. Did you ever meet Hector?<br /><br /> <br /><br /> I only met Hector once, here in Inverness; he was a guest down, of the Strathspey and Reel Society, and I'd admired his playing for years, hearing his records and - He stood out. He was a one-off. I mean, he stood head and shoulders above all the other fiddlers in his style. He had a style that was Hector MacAndrew; he wasn't sort of copying anybody or that and -<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Interviewer: What made it stand - made him stand out then Angus, do you think?<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Well, I don't know. Was it the easy style he had of playing and making everything stand out on the bowing and the phrasing, the wonderful phrasing, particularly playing that east coast style that we don't have - the slow Strathspeys - and his airs? And of course he'd a beautiful violin - I think it was a Pietro Guarneri - Italian violin that he had. But the only time I met him, we were invited back to his niece's house for a session and he made everything, the most difficult tune, look so simple. And he left, he left a lot of good pupils behind him - Douglas Lawrence.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Interviewer: Yes, and Gregor Borland.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Gregor Borland. I heard Gregor playing recently. I was down back in the summer adjudicating at the Auchtermuchty Festival and on the Sunday night Gregor was playing there and he played an air and he'd all Hector's style of bowing it, you know? I could see right away that was Hector's touch there. So Hector's gone but he's left something behind. <br /><br /> <br /><br /> Interviewer: And I suppose - Obviously you saw him on television too, did you? <br /><br /> <br /><br /> Aye, thon time that - when he was talking to Yehudi Menuhin. <br /><br /> <br /><br /> Interviewer: Yehudi Menuhin, yes.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Aye, that was a great programme. <br /><br /> <br /><br /> Interviewer: Yes