Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Angus Grant, Countryside Warden (1 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ANGUSGRANT_14
PLACENAME
Glen Nevis
DISTRICT
Lochaber
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmallie
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Aonghas Grant
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1577
KEYWORDS
Angus Grant
fiddlers
traditional music
Countryside Rangers
Ben Nevis
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about his life as a Countryside Warden at Glen Nevis.

In my younger days I was a shepherd, and deerstalking. And then I went with the Commission for years. I was - changed my lifestyle - and I was on diggers and hi-macs, JCBs. And then the last twelve years before I retired, when the ranger service started up, I got the job in Glenelg as Countryside Warden, and I was with the Ranger Service of the Highland Region for the last twelve years of my working life.

Interviewer: And where was that actually at?

In Glen Nevis.

Interviewer: Oh, Glen Nevis

Just at home there; it was very handy.

Interviewer: Mm-hmm.

We'd boys working on the paths going up the Ben. I mean, there was two thousand people a day going up the Ben on a good day, in the peak, in July and August, and the whole paths was actually falling apart. It was never meant for that; it was built just for the - a pony trail for the observatory that was built in the 1800s, and it was never meant for that traffic. And it's unbelievable the amount of people that I've seen on the top some days. There'd be five hundred people on the top at the one time and the whole place is - the environment's very, getting very shaky there, with people taking shortcuts and chewing up the hillside. And we were also involved with the West Highland Way and it's very interesting; you met a tremendous amount of people from all over the world there. And I enjoyed that last few years back out in amongst the hills again

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Angus Grant, Countryside Warden (1 of 2)

INVERNESS: Kilmallie

1990s

Angus Grant; fiddlers; traditional music; Countryside Rangers; Ben Nevis; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Angus Grant

Aonghas Grant, also known as the Left-handed Fiddler of Lochaber, has been playing fiddle since he was thirteen years old. His career spans over sixty years and he is still active as a teacher, soloist, composer and session participant, playing a wide range of fiddle music. Aonghas is a Gaelic speaker and particularly noted for his 'West Highland Style' of fiddling, influenced by both Gaelic and piping. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in the late 1990s, Aonghas talks to Andy Ross about his life as a Countryside Warden at Glen Nevis.<br /> <br /> In my younger days I was a shepherd, and deerstalking. And then I went with the Commission for years. I was - changed my lifestyle - and I was on diggers and hi-macs, JCBs. And then the last twelve years before I retired, when the ranger service started up, I got the job in Glenelg as Countryside Warden, and I was with the Ranger Service of the Highland Region for the last twelve years of my working life.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And where was that actually at?<br /> <br /> In Glen Nevis.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh, Glen Nevis<br /> <br /> Just at home there; it was very handy. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Mm-hmm.<br /> <br /> We'd boys working on the paths going up the Ben. I mean, there was two thousand people a day going up the Ben on a good day, in the peak, in July and August, and the whole paths was actually falling apart. It was never meant for that; it was built just for the - a pony trail for the observatory that was built in the 1800s, and it was never meant for that traffic. And it's unbelievable the amount of people that I've seen on the top some days. There'd be five hundred people on the top at the one time and the whole place is - the environment's very, getting very shaky there, with people taking shortcuts and chewing up the hillside. And we were also involved with the West Highland Way and it's very interesting; you met a tremendous amount of people from all over the world there. And I enjoyed that last few years back out in amongst the hills again