Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (2 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_BRODIE_02
PLACENAME
Brodie
DISTRICT
Forres
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
MORAYSHIRE
CREATOR
Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1588
KEYWORDS
castles
stately homes
clans
Brodies
NTS
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.

In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about the Highland Railway.

Interviewer: One of your great loves was for the railway?

Yes. I always say the Highland Railway was my first love; it was Highland until 1923 when it became part of the LMS although I still enjoyed it then but I liked it best - the old Highland Line. I used to go down to the station - Brodie had a station then - and two of the guards used to let me wave the flag to wave the train away. One of them, I remember, always used to blow his whistle at the same time which annoyed me because I felt the driver could quite well take the signal from my, my green flag. And, Oh I used to collect the names, the names of all the engines -all the Highland Railway passenger engines were named - and I used to have a little notebook. I wrote down the numbers and the names of all the ones I'd seen. Great excitement the first time I saw a number '50', the 'Brodie Castle'. That, I remember was at Aviemore. And oh, they had enchanting names too - castles, clans, bens, lochs - all sorts.

Interviewer: How did you feel when they decided to close that station at Brodie?

Well, sad in a way but it obviously was no longer economical. Originally it had been the freight traffic that had been the paying thing; farm implements, farm stock, grain and so on ,and timber - a great deal of timber was handled there - and it was just bang on the main road with the bus service so the passenger service when, when the freight diminished, the passenger service was mega little indeed. So they were right - it was sad - but they were right enough to close it down

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (2 of 16)

MORAYSHIRE

castles; stately homes; clans; Brodies; NTS; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Brodie of Brodie

Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about the Highland Railway.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: One of your great loves was for the railway?<br /> <br /> Yes. I always say the Highland Railway was my first love; it was Highland until 1923 when it became part of the LMS although I still enjoyed it then but I liked it best - the old Highland Line. I used to go down to the station - Brodie had a station then - and two of the guards used to let me wave the flag to wave the train away. One of them, I remember, always used to blow his whistle at the same time which annoyed me because I felt the driver could quite well take the signal from my, my green flag. And, Oh I used to collect the names, the names of all the engines -all the Highland Railway passenger engines were named - and I used to have a little notebook. I wrote down the numbers and the names of all the ones I'd seen. Great excitement the first time I saw a number '50', the 'Brodie Castle'. That, I remember was at Aviemore. And oh, they had enchanting names too - castles, clans, bens, lochs - all sorts.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How did you feel when they decided to close that station at Brodie?<br /> <br /> Well, sad in a way but it obviously was no longer economical. Originally it had been the freight traffic that had been the paying thing; farm implements, farm stock, grain and so on ,and timber - a great deal of timber was handled there - and it was just bang on the main road with the bus service so the passenger service when, when the freight diminished, the passenger service was mega little indeed. So they were right - it was sad - but they were right enough to close it down