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TITLE
Old and new bridges, Glenshiel
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_08_030_1618
PLACENAME
Shiel Bridge
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Glenshiel
DATE OF IMAGE
29 July 1982
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
The Highland Council Planning Department
ASSET ID
15883
KEYWORDS
roads
bridges
Parliamentary Roads
Old and new bridges, Glenshiel

The older bridge, in the foreground of this photograph, was constructed by Thomas Telford as part of the remaking of the road through Glenshiel, around 1815. Known as Eas-nan-Arm Bridge, the wide single-span arched bridge once carried the A87 but is now by-passed with a modern replacement.

The bridge is also known as "The Bridge of the Spaniards", commemorating the presence of around 300 Spanish soldiers in Loch Alsh in April 1719. They joined a Jacobite army assembled by Cameron of Lochiel, the Earl of Murray and Lord George Murray, which marched through Glen Shiel and met with Hanoverian troops. Although the sides were well matched in size and strength, the Jacobites were defeated and disbanded.

The modern replacement bridge can be seen in the background.

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Old and new bridges, Glenshiel

ROSS: Glenshiel

1980s

roads; bridges; Parliamentary Roads

The Highland Council Planning Department

The Highland Council Planning Dept

The older bridge, in the foreground of this photograph, was constructed by Thomas Telford as part of the remaking of the road through Glenshiel, around 1815. Known as Eas-nan-Arm Bridge, the wide single-span arched bridge once carried the A87 but is now by-passed with a modern replacement. <br /> <br /> The bridge is also known as "The Bridge of the Spaniards", commemorating the presence of around 300 Spanish soldiers in Loch Alsh in April 1719. They joined a Jacobite army assembled by Cameron of Lochiel, the Earl of Murray and Lord George Murray, which marched through Glen Shiel and met with Hanoverian troops. Although the sides were well matched in size and strength, the Jacobites were defeated and disbanded. <br /> <br /> The modern replacement bridge can be seen in the background.