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TITLE
Still at Glenmorangie Distillery
EXTERNAL ID
HC_PLANNING_08_036_1833
PLACENAME
Tain
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Tain
DATE OF IMAGE
26 October 1982
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
T. Kenneth MacKenzie
SOURCE
The Highland Council Planning Department
ASSET ID
15910
KEYWORDS
whisky
distilling
whiskey
distilleries
industry
Still at Glenmorangie Distillery

Glenmorangie is a single malt whisky distillery near Tain. It is owned by The Glenmorangie Company Ltd under the parent company LVMH Moët Hennessy · Louis Vuitton S.A.

Alcohol production began at Morangie Farm in the 1700s as a brewery. William Matheson acquired the farm in 1843, purchased two London Gin stills and converted it to a legal distillery. The distillery has expanded over the years and now has twelve stills, all of which resemble the original two. These stills are the tallest in Scotland, measuring 8m in height. The long necks of the stills are said to ensure that only the purest vapours make it to the top to be condensed into spirit during the distillation process.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Still at Glenmorangie Distillery

ROSS: Tain

1980s

whisky; distilling; whiskey; distilleries; industry

The Highland Council Planning Department

The Highland Council Planning Dept

Glenmorangie is a single malt whisky distillery near Tain. It is owned by The Glenmorangie Company Ltd under the parent company LVMH Moët Hennessy · Louis Vuitton S.A.<br /> <br /> Alcohol production began at Morangie Farm in the 1700s as a brewery. William Matheson acquired the farm in 1843, purchased two London Gin stills and converted it to a legal distillery. The distillery has expanded over the years and now has twelve stills, all of which resemble the original two. These stills are the tallest in Scotland, measuring 8m in height. The long necks of the stills are said to ensure that only the purest vapours make it to the top to be condensed into spirit during the distillation process.