Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (8 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_BRODIE_08
CREATOR
Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1596
KEYWORDS
castles
stately homes
clans
Brodies
NTS
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.

In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about the actress, Eleanor Mallet.

Interviewer: You were influenced when you were there very greatly by a famous actress?

Yes, Eleanor Mallet - forgotten now - but in her day, which is in her great day in the theatre was the Edwardian era - she was the original Candida in Shaw's play and in Shaw's opinion, I believe, the best Candida up till his death that there had ever played. In that she was understudied by Dame Sybill Thorndyke who was then a youngish actress. She was very much of the old school; she must have been very lovely, I think, in her youth as she was well into middle age by the time I knew her. And she had a - she had the old school style which was very good for the young students of that time because the naturalistic acting on the stage and on films, of course, had come in very much by then, and all the young students thought it was just easy - you just walk onto the stage and talk in a natural voice, with the result they probably weren't heard at all. And Eleanor Mallet was a wonderful person for making them - she may made them overact a bit but she made - she brought it out and I think she was a great influence on me, taught me that it wasn't as easy as all that but the thing had to be projected, however natural you were supposed to be on the stage, that it was coming over larger than life. And she was a very sweet person too. She went on well into old age still teaching.

Interviewer: You said to me once that her, her rehearsals and dress rehearsals were a bit -

Her rehearsals could be chaotic. Very often her dress rehearsals were complete chaos but the performance, even with the students, always had a sort of magic to them which was her coming over - her personality. She had a very warm personality; Irish by birth, as you can imagine from her name, and she had something of the Irish warmth in her I think

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (8 of 16)

castles; stately homes; clans; Brodies; NTS; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Brodie of Brodie

Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about the actress, Eleanor Mallet.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You were influenced when you were there very greatly by a famous actress?<br /> <br /> Yes, Eleanor Mallet - forgotten now - but in her day, which is in her great day in the theatre was the Edwardian era - she was the original Candida in Shaw's play and in Shaw's opinion, I believe, the best Candida up till his death that there had ever played. In that she was understudied by Dame Sybill Thorndyke who was then a youngish actress. She was very much of the old school; she must have been very lovely, I think, in her youth as she was well into middle age by the time I knew her. And she had a - she had the old school style which was very good for the young students of that time because the naturalistic acting on the stage and on films, of course, had come in very much by then, and all the young students thought it was just easy - you just walk onto the stage and talk in a natural voice, with the result they probably weren't heard at all. And Eleanor Mallet was a wonderful person for making them - she may made them overact a bit but she made - she brought it out and I think she was a great influence on me, taught me that it wasn't as easy as all that but the thing had to be projected, however natural you were supposed to be on the stage, that it was coming over larger than life. And she was a very sweet person too. She went on well into old age still teaching.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You said to me once that her, her rehearsals and dress rehearsals were a bit -<br /> <br /> Her rehearsals could be chaotic. Very often her dress rehearsals were complete chaos but the performance, even with the students, always had a sort of magic to them which was her coming over - her personality. She had a very warm personality; Irish by birth, as you can imagine from her name, and she had something of the Irish warmth in her I think