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TITLE
Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (9 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_BRODIE_09
CREATOR
Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1598
KEYWORDS
castles
stately homes
clans
Brodies
NTS
audio

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Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.

In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about some famous actors.

Interviewer: You occasionally rubbed shoulders with very famous actors indeed. You mentioned to me Robert Donat.

Yes.

Interviewer: What sort of person was he?

Robert Donat, he was - he was a - a very - well he was a very big film star at the time. I was in the Old Vic Company just at the outbreak of war. I was in a very small capacity, playing small parts and understudying, but he was a star and he was just at the height of his fame. His film 'Goodbye Mr. Chips', which was a colossal Christmas success was just released in the Provinces at that time and with the outbreak of war we didn't go into the Old Vic, we toured the Provinces instead. So, of course it was extremely popular. All the fans were flocking to see Robert Donat and we had a battle to get out of the stage door each night.The war by then had begun and the blackout was on so we came out with torches shone in our faces.

Interviewer: To see who you were?

All the fans were trying to see if we were Robert Donat. They didn't know that he was always smuggled out by a side door and didn't come out the stage door at all.

Interviewer: The other famous name that features in your story is Stewart Granger. He was in fact your best man?

Yes, he was the best man at my wedding. He was a fellow student with me at the Webber Douglas. He was in that Old Vic Company and we were getting married while the tour was on. In fact, we were playing - we were married in London - but we were playing in Streatham Hill Theatre which is now, I think, bingo or something like that. But it was one of the suburban theatres in London where the big tours used to go to and Stewart Granger was the - Jimmy, as he's - he's really 'Jimmy Stewart' - he took - changed his name from James Stewart because the James Stewart was by then coming to stardom and so he called himself Stewart Granger.- and Jimmy was the only one of that company that I'd known for any length of time, so I asked him to be my best man. And we were married in the morning at Holy Trinity, St. Marylebone. I - we had a short reception at the Lamb Hotel. I then deposited my bride at the Grosvenor Hotel in Victoria and took the train down to Streatham Hill where I had to play the matinee. I wasn't in the play that evening though, so I came back and we were able to have a nice first night of honeymoon evening

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Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (9 of 16)

castles; stately homes; clans; Brodies; NTS; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Brodie of Brodie

Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about some famous actors.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You occasionally rubbed shoulders with very famous actors indeed. You mentioned to me Robert Donat. <br /> <br /> Yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What sort of person was he?<br /> <br /> Robert Donat, he was - he was a - a very - well he was a very big film star at the time. I was in the Old Vic Company just at the outbreak of war. I was in a very small capacity, playing small parts and understudying, but he was a star and he was just at the height of his fame. His film 'Goodbye Mr. Chips', which was a colossal Christmas success was just released in the Provinces at that time and with the outbreak of war we didn't go into the Old Vic, we toured the Provinces instead. So, of course it was extremely popular. All the fans were flocking to see Robert Donat and we had a battle to get out of the stage door each night.The war by then had begun and the blackout was on so we came out with torches shone in our faces.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: To see who you were?<br /> <br /> All the fans were trying to see if we were Robert Donat. They didn't know that he was always smuggled out by a side door and didn't come out the stage door at all.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The other famous name that features in your story is Stewart Granger. He was in fact your best man?<br /> <br /> Yes, he was the best man at my wedding. He was a fellow student with me at the Webber Douglas. He was in that Old Vic Company and we were getting married while the tour was on. In fact, we were playing - we were married in London - but we were playing in Streatham Hill Theatre which is now, I think, bingo or something like that. But it was one of the suburban theatres in London where the big tours used to go to and Stewart Granger was the - Jimmy, as he's - he's really 'Jimmy Stewart' - he took - changed his name from James Stewart because the James Stewart was by then coming to stardom and so he called himself Stewart Granger.- and Jimmy was the only one of that company that I'd known for any length of time, so I asked him to be my best man. And we were married in the morning at Holy Trinity, St. Marylebone. I - we had a short reception at the Lamb Hotel. I then deposited my bride at the Grosvenor Hotel in Victoria and took the train down to Streatham Hill where I had to play the matinee. I wasn't in the play that evening though, so I came back and we were able to have a nice first night of honeymoon evening