Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (11 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_BRODIE_11
CREATOR
Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1601
KEYWORDS
castles
stately homes
clans
Brodies
NTS
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.

In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about film acting.

Interviewer: I've often heard it said that theatrical digs were like one big happy family - how true would that be?

Not, I think. Oh, I don't know. It's difficult to say. Sometimes - I think it varies very much. Generally one was just there for sleep. One was probably rehearsing in the day time and playing in the evening. Just went there for bed and breakfast more or less.

Interviewer: Some of your contemporaries went into films - You mentioned Stewart Granger and Robert Donat had already being a success. How did you feel about the film world?

I never enjoyed making films much. Perhaps I should have if I'd done more but to be perfectly frank I only played two films in my life, one of whom was the film of Oliver Twist made by David Lean, shortly after the war, with Robert Newton -

Interviewer: John Howard Davies

- a young John Howard Davies as Oliver and I had only one line in it and I knew I had my moment of glory standing right in the centre of the picture with the principals, and it was one line. The whole sequence took us two and a half very cold days - we were outside - very cold days to accomplish; it lasted, I think, less than two and a half minutes on the screen and I found it difficult as hell making it. However, if I'd been possibly Robert Newton with his nice warm caravan which he had -

Interviewer: Things might have been different?

- I might have enjoyed it more

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (11 of 16)

castles; stately homes; clans; Brodies; NTS; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Brodie of Brodie

Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about film acting.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I've often heard it said that theatrical digs were like one big happy family - how true would that be?<br /> <br /> Not, I think. Oh, I don't know. It's difficult to say. Sometimes - I think it varies very much. Generally one was just there for sleep. One was probably rehearsing in the day time and playing in the evening. Just went there for bed and breakfast more or less.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Some of your contemporaries went into films - You mentioned Stewart Granger and Robert Donat had already being a success. How did you feel about the film world?<br /> <br /> I never enjoyed making films much. Perhaps I should have if I'd done more but to be perfectly frank I only played two films in my life, one of whom was the film of Oliver Twist made by David Lean, shortly after the war, with Robert Newton -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: John Howard Davies<br /> <br /> - a young John Howard Davies as Oliver and I had only one line in it and I knew I had my moment of glory standing right in the centre of the picture with the principals, and it was one line. The whole sequence took us two and a half very cold days - we were outside - very cold days to accomplish; it lasted, I think, less than two and a half minutes on the screen and I found it difficult as hell making it. However, if I'd been possibly Robert Newton with his nice warm caravan which he had -<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Things might have been different?<br /> <br /> - I might have enjoyed it more