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TITLE
Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (12 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_BRODIE_12
CREATOR
Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1603
KEYWORDS
castles
stately homes
clans
Brodies
NTS
audio

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Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.

In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about his service in World War II.

Interviewer: When the war broke out you enlisted, as they say in the States, and you really had quite a boring war you said to me?

Yes, I did really. I was in the artillery - in the anti-aircraft. At the end finally we were turned into a counter battery fielding, field roles, I think to begin with, in the early part it was all anti-craft. We always seemed either to be sent to a - that was in this country - to a place which was afterwards bombed or go to a place which had been bombed before we got there. We seemed to see extraordinarly little real action. I mean, we were the first on the Forth, opposite Rosyth, which occasionally we put up a barage or something but we no real big engagements and after we'd left there, of course, the big raid on Clydeside came and all came up the Forth and so we went there. And we went, went to Coventry after the big Coventry raid, and later on we went to Essex, near Clacton, where the bombers used to come in to London but they stopped coming as soon as we got there. I don't think our presence had anything to do with it. And so it was really what I remember about the war most is the boredom. The times of action were more fun but they were really few and far between

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Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (12 of 16)

castles; stately homes; clans; Brodies; NTS; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Brodie of Brodie

Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about his service in World War II.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: When the war broke out you enlisted, as they say in the States, and you really had quite a boring war you said to me?<br /> <br /> Yes, I did really. I was in the artillery - in the anti-aircraft. At the end finally we were turned into a counter battery fielding, field roles, I think to begin with, in the early part it was all anti-craft. We always seemed either to be sent to a - that was in this country - to a place which was afterwards bombed or go to a place which had been bombed before we got there. We seemed to see extraordinarly little real action. I mean, we were the first on the Forth, opposite Rosyth, which occasionally we put up a barage or something but we no real big engagements and after we'd left there, of course, the big raid on Clydeside came and all came up the Forth and so we went there. And we went, went to Coventry after the big Coventry raid, and later on we went to Essex, near Clacton, where the bombers used to come in to London but they stopped coming as soon as we got there. I don't think our presence had anything to do with it. And so it was really what I remember about the war most is the boredom. The times of action were more fun but they were really few and far between