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TITLE
Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (16 of 16)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_BRODIE_16
PLACENAME
Brodie
DISTRICT
Forres
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
MORAYSHIRE
CREATOR
Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1609
KEYWORDS
castles
stately homes
clans
Brodies
NTS
audio

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Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.

In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about his life as a tour guide.

Interviewer: When you see strangers wandering through parts of the castle that you looked upon as your own, how does that affect you? How do you feel when they're looking at books that you've treasured and other items that you treasure?

Oh, I enjoy it, especially if they like it too. I do a lot of guide work in the castle. In fact, May and June last year I did full-time guidework, seven days a week. And, oh, well, I did take some time off but I always got a stand-in guide when - times I was off - and I enjoyed it and I still do guidework - I help them out whenever they're short of guides and I enjoy it. I mean, you - well, I've learn a lot. I learned things I never knew before; some expert on some particular thing comes through and tells me something I didn't know. And then quite often I get stumped by a question which means I've got to go the book and find out the answer and so I'm learning all the time. It's all terribly interesting. And if I do get button-holed by a dead bore I can usually get away, you see, because I carry my badge, my National Trust badge, as an official guide so I can say, 'Oh, excuse me' and go over and talk to somebody else in the other corner of the room.

Interviewer: How many people know it's the Brodie of Brodie that's taking them round?

Some people do know me by sight. More now since the guidebook was published because unfortunately there's a photograph of me on the front with my dog and so they, they recognise me from that. I do have my name on my badge. I don't display it - I sometimes cover it up and I sometimes turn slightly away - but sometimes I see them suddenly staring at my badge. And at other times people say to me, 'Do any of the family live here any more?' and I say, 'Well, yes, as a matter of fact, I do.'

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Brodie of Brodie talks to Sam Marshall (16 of 16)

MORAYSHIRE

castles; stately homes; clans; Brodies; NTS; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Brodie of Brodie

Montague Ninian Alexander Brodie (1912 - 2003) became chief of Clan Brodie on 15 February, 1943, the 25th Brodie of Brodie. Educated at Eton, he went on to join the acting profession and it was during his time with the Perth Repertory Company that he met his future wife, Helena Budgeon. Later in his life he gave up the theatre and helped his mother run the Brodie Estate. During the Second World War he served with the Royal Artillery and later held the offices of Justice of the Peace for Morayshire, and Deputy Lieutenant of Nairnshire. In 1978 he was forced, through financial circumstances, to hand Brodie Castle over to the National Trust for Scotland.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the Moray Firth Radio programme 'Marshall Meets' Ninian talks to Sam Marshall about his life as a tour guide.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: When you see strangers wandering through parts of the castle that you looked upon as your own, how does that affect you? How do you feel when they're looking at books that you've treasured and other items that you treasure?<br /> <br /> Oh, I enjoy it, especially if they like it too. I do a lot of guide work in the castle. In fact, May and June last year I did full-time guidework, seven days a week. And, oh, well, I did take some time off but I always got a stand-in guide when - times I was off - and I enjoyed it and I still do guidework - I help them out whenever they're short of guides and I enjoy it. I mean, you - well, I've learn a lot. I learned things I never knew before; some expert on some particular thing comes through and tells me something I didn't know. And then quite often I get stumped by a question which means I've got to go the book and find out the answer and so I'm learning all the time. It's all terribly interesting. And if I do get button-holed by a dead bore I can usually get away, you see, because I carry my badge, my National Trust badge, as an official guide so I can say, 'Oh, excuse me' and go over and talk to somebody else in the other corner of the room.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How many people know it's the Brodie of Brodie that's taking them round?<br /> <br /> Some people do know me by sight. More now since the guidebook was published because unfortunately there's a photograph of me on the front with my dog and so they, they recognise me from that. I do have my name on my badge. I don't display it - I sometimes cover it up and I sometimes turn slightly away - but sometimes I see them suddenly staring at my badge. And at other times people say to me, 'Do any of the family live here any more?' and I say, 'Well, yes, as a matter of fact, I do.'