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TITLE
The Fletchers of Rosehaugh
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ELIZSUTHERLAND_01
PLACENAME
Rosehaugh
DISTRICT
Avoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Avoch
DATE OF RECORDING
1991
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Elizabeth Sutherland
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1610
KEYWORDS
entrepreneurs
estates
Black Isle
audio

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Rosehaugh Estate in Avoch was bought from the MacKenzie family by James Fletcher of Avoch in 1864. His second son, James Douglas Fletcher, inherited the estate upon his father's death in 1885. In this audio extract, Elizabeth Sutherland talks about the Fletchers of Rosehaugh. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series, transmitted in 1991.

The estate of Rosehaugh belonged to the MacKenzies and it wasn't until about 1864 that a certain James Fletcher, who was the son of an Avoch fisherman, made his fortune, we think in the East India Company but nobody's quite sure how he made his fortune, bought the estate. There was a very nice house there at that time which had been built by the MacKenzies in the eighteenth century. When he died, his eldest son, in fact, pre-deceased him by about a year, so it was his second son, also a James, known as James D., James Douglas Fletcher, who inherited. Now James Douglas, like his father, had a brilliant brain and he went to Cambridge and in fact he was trained as a lawyer, but he was a financier, an entrepreneur, who made a very, very great fortune. In fact, the size of his fortune has entered the realms of myth but in fact we do know he had either a gold or a diamond mine in South Africa and tea plantations in Ceylon and rubber plantations in the Far East, and that he dabbled in finance very, very successfully. He was a funny little man; he looked a little bit like King George V and I'm told that he wore very flashy clothes, rather outrageous tweeds and I believe red was a colour that he was quite fond of. He was also very finnickity about his clothing and about his wardrobe and about how the way the house was kept

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The Fletchers of Rosehaugh

ROSS: Avoch

1990s

entrepreneurs; estates; Black Isle; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Fletchers of Rosehaugh

Rosehaugh Estate in Avoch was bought from the MacKenzie family by James Fletcher of Avoch in 1864. His second son, James Douglas Fletcher, inherited the estate upon his father's death in 1885. In this audio extract, Elizabeth Sutherland talks about the Fletchers of Rosehaugh. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series, transmitted in 1991.<br /> <br /> The estate of Rosehaugh belonged to the MacKenzies and it wasn't until about 1864 that a certain James Fletcher, who was the son of an Avoch fisherman, made his fortune, we think in the East India Company but nobody's quite sure how he made his fortune, bought the estate. There was a very nice house there at that time which had been built by the MacKenzies in the eighteenth century. When he died, his eldest son, in fact, pre-deceased him by about a year, so it was his second son, also a James, known as James D., James Douglas Fletcher, who inherited. Now James Douglas, like his father, had a brilliant brain and he went to Cambridge and in fact he was trained as a lawyer, but he was a financier, an entrepreneur, who made a very, very great fortune. In fact, the size of his fortune has entered the realms of myth but in fact we do know he had either a gold or a diamond mine in South Africa and tea plantations in Ceylon and rubber plantations in the Far East, and that he dabbled in finance very, very successfully. He was a funny little man; he looked a little bit like King George V and I'm told that he wore very flashy clothes, rather outrageous tweeds and I believe red was a colour that he was quite fond of. He was also very finnickity about his clothing and about his wardrobe and about how the way the house was kept