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TITLE
James D. Fletcher of Rosehaugh
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ELIZSUTHERLAND_02
PLACENAME
Rosehaugh
DISTRICT
Avoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Avoch
DATE OF RECORDING
1991
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Elizabeth Sutherland
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1612
KEYWORDS
entrepreneurs
estates
Black Isle
mansions
audio

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Rosehaugh House was one of the largest mansions in the Highlands. Originally built for Sir Roderick MacKenzie of Scatwell in 1798, it was bought by James Fletcher of Avoch in 1864. Further extensions were carried out by Fletcher's son, James Douglas Fletcher. In this audio extract, Elizabeth Sutherland talks about some of these improvements. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series, transmitted in 1991.

In 1895 he [James D. Fletcher] decided that he wanted to have a very much larger establishment. Now, the rumours are that he had a flirtation or a romance with the Baroness Orczy, authoress of 'The Scarlet Pimpernel', and she had rejected him, to say that her father's stables were as big as house, so that must have stung him to the quick. The other rumour was that he fell in love with the Baroness Burton who said that she had plenty of money and would prefer to marry a title. That seemed to have been, if it was true, the catalyst to start the building of this house. He filled it with the most priceless treasures. It must have been a little bit like a museum. I believe there was an huge brass Buddha in the grounds. The houses were hung with the most priceless tapestries which all ended up in museums eventually. The dining room was an Italian chapel which rumour says he more or less bought in Italy and established as his dining room and one of his descendents, now dead alas, has said she always felt very embarrassed having these wonderful, sumptuous meals in what was in fact a chapel. There was a swimming pool lined with blue Persian tiles. Outside the swimming pool, at the entrance to it, there was Italian fountains with two brass elephants, either side of this fountain. The rooms were all called after the different kings and queens of Scotland. The smoking room was lined with cedar with an enormous fireplace. There was central heating, if you please, away back in those days

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James D. Fletcher of Rosehaugh

ROSS: Avoch

1990s

entrepreneurs; estates; Black Isle; mansions; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Fletchers of Rosehaugh

Rosehaugh House was one of the largest mansions in the Highlands. Originally built for Sir Roderick MacKenzie of Scatwell in 1798, it was bought by James Fletcher of Avoch in 1864. Further extensions were carried out by Fletcher's son, James Douglas Fletcher. In this audio extract, Elizabeth Sutherland talks about some of these improvements. The extract is from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series, transmitted in 1991.<br /> <br /> In 1895 he [James D. Fletcher] decided that he wanted to have a very much larger establishment. Now, the rumours are that he had a flirtation or a romance with the Baroness Orczy, authoress of 'The Scarlet Pimpernel', and she had rejected him, to say that her father's stables were as big as house, so that must have stung him to the quick. The other rumour was that he fell in love with the Baroness Burton who said that she had plenty of money and would prefer to marry a title. That seemed to have been, if it was true, the catalyst to start the building of this house. He filled it with the most priceless treasures. It must have been a little bit like a museum. I believe there was an huge brass Buddha in the grounds. The houses were hung with the most priceless tapestries which all ended up in museums eventually. The dining room was an Italian chapel which rumour says he more or less bought in Italy and established as his dining room and one of his descendents, now dead alas, has said she always felt very embarrassed having these wonderful, sumptuous meals in what was in fact a chapel. There was a swimming pool lined with blue Persian tiles. Outside the swimming pool, at the entrance to it, there was Italian fountains with two brass elephants, either side of this fountain. The rooms were all called after the different kings and queens of Scotland. The smoking room was lined with cedar with an enormous fireplace. There was central heating, if you please, away back in those days