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TITLE
Prophecies of the Brahan Seer
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ELIZSUTHERLAND_04
PLACENAME
Rosehaugh
DISTRICT
Avoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Avoch
DATE OF RECORDING
1991
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
Elizabeth Sutherland
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1613
KEYWORDS
second sight
prophecies
prophecy
Fletchers
seers
audio

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The Brahan Seer, known in his native language as 'Coinneach Odhar', was a legendary seventeenth-century Highland folk prophet who foretold future events. Many of his predictions have been shown to come true. In this extract, taken from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series, Elizabeth Sutherland relates one of the Seer's predictions concerning the village of Avoch.

To go right back to the history of the Rosehaugh Estate it was, in fact, called Pittanochtie, which is a Pictish name, so it showed that there's been settlement there for a long, long time. It was acquired by Sir George MacKenzie in the 17th century, known as the 'Bloody MacKenzie' for his harshness towards Covenanters, but he was a very great lawyer who had great experiences of second sight himself. It must have been during his lifetime that the Brahan Seer made a prediction about the Rosehaugh Estate - incidentally it was called Rosehaugh, which just means a bank of roses, because of the profusion of wild roses that grew in that area - that the Brahan Seer's allegedly said that 'the day will come when the seed of the goat will inherit from the seed of the deer and the bonnie Black Isle will fall into the hands of the fishermen of Avoch'. Well, that did really literally come true when Mr. Fletcher senior, James Fletcher, acquired the estate of Rosehaugh which was a very large proportion of the Black Isle. He was the son of an Avoch fisherman and he made his fortune through being adopted by an aunt who educated him.

Now the Fletcher coat of arms bore the goat whereas of course the MacKenzie coat of arms is the stag's head, the caberfeidh, so that really is a very poetic way of saying 'the seed of the goat inherited from the seed of the deer' and people reckon that this was the fulfilment of one of the Seer's prophecies. Of course, they carry it a bit further. All Avoch fishermen today own their own houses so it could be said that the bonnie Black Isle, or a great deal of it anyhow, became the property of the fishermen of Avoch

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Prophecies of the Brahan Seer

ROSS: Avoch

1990s

second sight; prophecies; prophecy; Fletchers; seers; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Brahan Seer

The Brahan Seer, known in his native language as 'Coinneach Odhar', was a legendary seventeenth-century Highland folk prophet who foretold future events. Many of his predictions have been shown to come true. In this extract, taken from Moray Firth Radio's 'Recollections' series, Elizabeth Sutherland relates one of the Seer's predictions concerning the village of Avoch. <br /> <br /> To go right back to the history of the Rosehaugh Estate it was, in fact, called Pittanochtie, which is a Pictish name, so it showed that there's been settlement there for a long, long time. It was acquired by Sir George MacKenzie in the 17th century, known as the 'Bloody MacKenzie' for his harshness towards Covenanters, but he was a very great lawyer who had great experiences of second sight himself. It must have been during his lifetime that the Brahan Seer made a prediction about the Rosehaugh Estate - incidentally it was called Rosehaugh, which just means a bank of roses, because of the profusion of wild roses that grew in that area - that the Brahan Seer's allegedly said that 'the day will come when the seed of the goat will inherit from the seed of the deer and the bonnie Black Isle will fall into the hands of the fishermen of Avoch'. Well, that did really literally come true when Mr. Fletcher senior, James Fletcher, acquired the estate of Rosehaugh which was a very large proportion of the Black Isle. He was the son of an Avoch fisherman and he made his fortune through being adopted by an aunt who educated him.<br /> <br /> Now the Fletcher coat of arms bore the goat whereas of course the MacKenzie coat of arms is the stag's head, the caberfeidh, so that really is a very poetic way of saying 'the seed of the goat inherited from the seed of the deer' and people reckon that this was the fulfilment of one of the Seer's prophecies. Of course, they carry it a bit further. All Avoch fishermen today own their own houses so it could be said that the bonnie Black Isle, or a great deal of it anyhow, became the property of the fishermen of Avoch