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TITLE
Life in the Western Isles (1 of 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_FREDMACAULAY_01
PLACENAME
Sollas
DISTRICT
North Uist
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: North Uist
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Fred MacAulay
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1616
KEYWORDS
Outer Hebrides
crofters
crofts
crofting
broadcasting
audio

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Fred MacAulay was born in Sollas, North Uist, in 1925. Educated at Inverness Academy and Edinburgh University, he went on to become Senior Gaelic Producer of BBC Scotland in 1964, and Manager of BBC Highland in 1979. An active campaigner for the continuation of the Gaelic language, he was one of the most distinguished Gaels of his generation and made a lasting contribution to Gaelic culture. He died in Inverness in 2003, aged 78. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, Fred talks to Sam Marshall about life in the Western Isles.

Interviewer: You were born in North Uist?

Yes indeed, in a little village called Sollas, which is ten miles from the so-called capital, Lochmaddy, and one of the bonniest villages, of course, in the whole of North Uist. In fact, the bonniest; beautiful white sands and nice cold Atlantic, nice hills behind, good fishing, good everything, and good company. And Sollas is quite interesting in lots of ways, not least because it was evicted in 1849 and then resettled in 1898. And that's when my grandparents came in, in 1898, to what was just simply an open - an open area, an open space. There were two settlements: Sollas, it's also the district name, but it's also the village - Sollas, and another one called Greinetobht. They're adjacent to one another. Prior to 1898 it had been a tack, a farm, and they came in with nothing but the bare ground. They had to start building their homes the byres, the barns, and when they were doing this they lived, in fact, in - The farmhouse was standing and, in fact, lived in, so they got accommodation there, and in the barn, I suppose, and with various other people in Middlequarter and Malacleit while they built all that. And they did that straight off, in one summer.

Interviewer: In one summer they did all that?

On summer, yes. And funnily enough they built the - not funnily enough, one can understand it - they built the barns and the byres first; cattle first - the thing that was going to be their, I suppose, their income - and then built their own houses after that

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Life in the Western Isles (1 of 3)

INVERNESS: North Uist

1980s

Outer Hebrides; crofters; crofts; crofting; broadcasting; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Fred MacAulay

Fred MacAulay was born in Sollas, North Uist, in 1925. Educated at Inverness Academy and Edinburgh University, he went on to become Senior Gaelic Producer of BBC Scotland in 1964, and Manager of BBC Highland in 1979. An active campaigner for the continuation of the Gaelic language, he was one of the most distinguished Gaels of his generation and made a lasting contribution to Gaelic culture. He died in Inverness in 2003, aged 78. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, Fred talks to Sam Marshall about life in the Western Isles.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You were born in North Uist?<br /> <br /> Yes indeed, in a little village called Sollas, which is ten miles from the so-called capital, Lochmaddy, and one of the bonniest villages, of course, in the whole of North Uist. In fact, the bonniest; beautiful white sands and nice cold Atlantic, nice hills behind, good fishing, good everything, and good company. And Sollas is quite interesting in lots of ways, not least because it was evicted in 1849 and then resettled in 1898. And that's when my grandparents came in, in 1898, to what was just simply an open - an open area, an open space. There were two settlements: Sollas, it's also the district name, but it's also the village - Sollas, and another one called Greinetobht. They're adjacent to one another. Prior to 1898 it had been a tack, a farm, and they came in with nothing but the bare ground. They had to start building their homes the byres, the barns, and when they were doing this they lived, in fact, in - The farmhouse was standing and, in fact, lived in, so they got accommodation there, and in the barn, I suppose, and with various other people in Middlequarter and Malacleit while they built all that. And they did that straight off, in one summer.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: In one summer they did all that? <br /> <br /> On summer, yes. And funnily enough they built the - not funnily enough, one can understand it - they built the barns and the byres first; cattle first - the thing that was going to be their, I suppose, their income - and then built their own houses after that