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TITLE
Characters from Sollas, North Uist
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_FREDMACAULAY_04
PLACENAME
Sollas
DISTRICT
North Uist
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: North Uist
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Fred MacAulay
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1621
KEYWORDS
Outer Hebrides
crofters
crofts
crofting
broadcasting
audio

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Fred MacAulay was born in Sollas, North Uist, in 1925. Educated at Inverness Academy and Edinburgh University, he went on to become Senior Gaelic Producer of BBC Scotland in 1964, and Manager of BBC Highland in 1979. An active campaigner for the continuation of the Gaelic language, he was one of the most distinguished Gaels of his generation and made a lasting contribution to Gaelic culture. He died in Inverness in 2003, aged 78. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, Fred talks to Sam Marshall about some of the local characters from his childhood.

Interviewer: What about people you remember from your boyhood in Sollas?

Well, I think every village had its own characters. The ones that I remember most, I think, were one in particular, whom I'm sure if he'd had an education, he would actually have been quite a good novelist, I suspect, because his flights of imagination were quite something, and the community enjoyed them, you know? They, they made a point of going to hear Iain once in a while, you see, to see, to see just what his latest creation was. And there was another character, a totally different one, that I'll always remember because of the air of sanctity roundabout him. He was, at this time when I remember him, he was blind and very deaf, but I would feel deprived, actually, if I left the island without going to see him because he was such a marvellous character and he had, as I say, an aura of sanctity, and you - almost tangible it was - and, of course, in those days too, you didn't leave the village without going into every house to say goodbye.

Interviewer: How long did that take you?

Well, twelve house, ten houses, in fact, in Sollas, so best part of the morning. You know, if you were leaving at lunchtime, you probably better get on the road about ten to make sure you got back in time. The holidaymakers coming home in the summer - this again before the war - they used to leave absolutely laden, you see, because this time they'd be, say, married in Glasgow with families, and every house, if they weren't careful, loaded them with a chicken and a couple of dozen eggs, and a bag of potatoes and - You know, you needed a pantechnicon to get yourself back to Glasgow

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Characters from Sollas, North Uist

INVERNESS: North Uist

1980s

Outer Hebrides; crofters; crofts; crofting; broadcasting; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Fred MacAulay

Fred MacAulay was born in Sollas, North Uist, in 1925. Educated at Inverness Academy and Edinburgh University, he went on to become Senior Gaelic Producer of BBC Scotland in 1964, and Manager of BBC Highland in 1979. An active campaigner for the continuation of the Gaelic language, he was one of the most distinguished Gaels of his generation and made a lasting contribution to Gaelic culture. He died in Inverness in 2003, aged 78. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, Fred talks to Sam Marshall about some of the local characters from his childhood.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What about people you remember from your boyhood in Sollas?<br /> <br /> Well, I think every village had its own characters. The ones that I remember most, I think, were one in particular, whom I'm sure if he'd had an education, he would actually have been quite a good novelist, I suspect, because his flights of imagination were quite something, and the community enjoyed them, you know? They, they made a point of going to hear Iain once in a while, you see, to see, to see just what his latest creation was. And there was another character, a totally different one, that I'll always remember because of the air of sanctity roundabout him. He was, at this time when I remember him, he was blind and very deaf, but I would feel deprived, actually, if I left the island without going to see him because he was such a marvellous character and he had, as I say, an aura of sanctity, and you - almost tangible it was - and, of course, in those days too, you didn't leave the village without going into every house to say goodbye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How long did that take you?<br /> <br /> Well, twelve house, ten houses, in fact, in Sollas, so best part of the morning. You know, if you were leaving at lunchtime, you probably better get on the road about ten to make sure you got back in time. The holidaymakers coming home in the summer - this again before the war - they used to leave absolutely laden, you see, because this time they'd be, say, married in Glasgow with families, and every house, if they weren't careful, loaded them with a chicken and a couple of dozen eggs, and a bag of potatoes and - You know, you needed a pantechnicon to get yourself back to Glasgow