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TITLE
Fred MacAulay on Future of Gaelic (1 of 2)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_FREDMACAULAY_15
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Fred MacAulay
SOURCE
Moray Firth Radio
ASSET ID
1633
KEYWORDS
Outer Hebrides
broadcasting
audio

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Fred MacAulay was born in Sollas, North Uist, in 1925. Educated at Inverness Academy and Edinburgh University, he went on to become Senior Gaelic Producer of BBC Scotland in 1964, and Manager of BBC Highland in 1979. An active campaigner for the continuation of the Gaelic language, he was one of the most distinguished Gaels of his generation and made a lasting contribution to Gaelic culture. He died in Inverness in 2003, aged 78. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, Fred talks to Sam Marshall about the future of Gaelic.

Interviewer: Fred, you've spent many, many years ensuring the existence of the Gaelic language. How far do you feel you've been successful and what hope do you hold for the future of it?

It's an awfully difficult question to answer. You know, there are so many straws in the wind which are very optimistic indeed, and then there are others which I find much less so. When you think of what's happened in my own field, for example, where I started with one and a half hours of Gaelic on radio a week, we're now at about twenty-four, and it's - there is provision for it to increase, and provision for television as well to get out of its doldrums. That's not the fault of the producers concerned, it's the fault of the system which doesn't provide a sufficient number of production staff to do more programmes. But there is hope that that will change over the next few years. And there, I think, I ought to say that the impetuous for a lot of it within the BBC was through the then Controller, Alastair Milne, who is now the Director General of the BBC. Without his interest, genuine interest - he learned to speak the language - and his help, I don't think Gaelic Broadcasting would be where it is today and that's not to say that I'm happy with where it is

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Fred MacAulay on Future of Gaelic (1 of 2)

1980s

Outer Hebrides; broadcasting; audio

Moray Firth Radio

MFR: Fred MacAulay

Fred MacAulay was born in Sollas, North Uist, in 1925. Educated at Inverness Academy and Edinburgh University, he went on to become Senior Gaelic Producer of BBC Scotland in 1964, and Manager of BBC Highland in 1979. An active campaigner for the continuation of the Gaelic language, he was one of the most distinguished Gaels of his generation and made a lasting contribution to Gaelic culture. He died in Inverness in 2003, aged 78. In this audio extract, originally recorded for 'Moray Firth People' in 1983, Fred talks to Sam Marshall about the future of Gaelic.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Fred, you've spent many, many years ensuring the existence of the Gaelic language. How far do you feel you've been successful and what hope do you hold for the future of it?<br /> <br /> It's an awfully difficult question to answer. You know, there are so many straws in the wind which are very optimistic indeed, and then there are others which I find much less so. When you think of what's happened in my own field, for example, where I started with one and a half hours of Gaelic on radio a week, we're now at about twenty-four, and it's - there is provision for it to increase, and provision for television as well to get out of its doldrums. That's not the fault of the producers concerned, it's the fault of the system which doesn't provide a sufficient number of production staff to do more programmes. But there is hope that that will change over the next few years. And there, I think, I ought to say that the impetuous for a lot of it within the BBC was through the then Controller, Alastair Milne, who is now the Director General of the BBC. Without his interest, genuine interest - he learned to speak the language - and his help, I don't think Gaelic Broadcasting would be where it is today and that's not to say that I'm happy with where it is